First Church of Christ, Scientist - Brooklyn, N.Y.
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First Church of Christ, Scientist

156 Sterling Place (Flatbush & Seventh Avenues)
Brooklyn, N.Y. 11217


Organ Specifications:
156 Sterling Place (since 1956)
II/16 Wicks Organ Co., Op. 2974 (1949); enl. Schantz (1983)
1256 Dean Street at New York Avenue (1914-?)
• III/39 Austin Organ Co., Op. 410 (1915); reb. (1970)
404 Lafayette Avenue, near Franklin Avenue (1897-1910)
• II/9 George Earle (1897)
266 Cumberland Street, near Lafayette Ave. (c.1895-1897)
• unknown


The First Church of Christ, Scientist of Brooklyn was established in 1886 by Mrs. P.J. Leonard, C.S.D. By 1895, services were held at 266 Cumberland Street, between Lafayette and DeKalb Avenues, in the Fort Greene area of Brooklyn. On October 3, 1897, the society dedicated a new edifice that was located on Lafayette Avenue, near Franklin Avenue. Designed by Montrose Morris in the Greek Revival style, the structure had an exterior treatment of buff pressed brick with white sandstone trimmings. The interior was lighted by large windows on both sides and had pews and other furnishings of oak. A total about 600 persons could be accommodated on the main floor and gallery. This edifice was sold to Siloam Presbyterian Church in 1910.

Original First Church of Christ, Scientist (now Hebron Seventh-day Adventist Church) - Brooklyn, N.Y. (photo: Bridge and Tunnel Club website)  
1256 Dean Street
   
In 1914 the congregation moved to the Crown Heights area where they built a new edifice on the southwest corner of Dean Street and New York Avenue. Designed by Henry Ives Cobb, the cornerstone was laid in 1910, but the completed edifice was not dedicated until May 17, 1914. The First Reader was Mr. J. Fred Erdmann.

In 1956 the First Church congregation moved to the edifice built as the Fourth Church, at 156 Sterling Place in Park Slope, retaining the name of First Church of Christ, Scientist. Subsequently, the edifice on Dean Street was acquired by the Hebron Seventh-day Adventist Church. In 2011 the Sterling Place building was purchased by the Berkeley Carroll School, which has been renovating the building for its academic needs; the First Church congregation continues to use the space.
               
  Wicks Organ, Op. 2974 (1949) in First Church of Christ, Scientist - Brooklyn, N.Y.
 
credit: John Bishop
Wicks Organ Company
Highland, Ill. – Opus 2974 (1949); enl. Schantz (1983)
Direct-Electric key action
2 manuals, 24 registers, 14 stops, 16 ranks


This organ was originally built in 1949 for the Fourth Church by the Wicks Organ Company of Highland, Ill., and had 9 ranks of pipes. In 1983, the organ was enlarged to 16 ranks by the Schantz Organ Company of Orrville, Ohio. In 2015, as the building was renovated for use by the Berkeley Carroll School, the organ was removed and placed in storage.
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Open Diapason
61
4
  Rohr Flute *
61
8
  Melodia
61
2
  Super Octave *
61
8
  Dulciana
61
    Mixture III ranks *
183
8
  Unda Maris
61
    Chimes  
4
  Octave
61
    Tremolo  
               
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon
97
2 2/3
  Nazard (fr. Bourdon)
8
  Stopped Flute (fr. Bourdon)
2
  Flautino (fr. Bourdon)
8
  Salicional
73
8
  Oboe
61
8
  Voix Celeste
61
8
  Trompette *
73
4
  Flute d'Amour (fr. Bourdon)
4
  Clarion * (from Trompette)
4
  Violina (fr. Salicional)
12
    Tremolo  
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
16
  Bourdon
56
4
  Flute (fr. Bourdon)
16
  Lieblich Gedeckt
SW
16
  Contre Trompette * (ext. SW)
12
8
  Bass Flute (fr. Bourdon)
       
           
* added by Schantz
               
Organ in edifice located on Dean Street:

Austin Organ Company
Hartford, Conn. – Opus 410 (1915); reb. (1970)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 39 stops


For their new edifice on Dean Street, the Austin Organ Company of Hartford built a three-manual organ having 39 stops. This organ was rebuilt in 1970 by an unknown builder who used parts from the Schantz Organ Company. Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
               
Organ in edifice located on Lafayette Avenue:

George Earle
Hempstead, N.Y. (1897)
Unknown action
2 manuals, 9 stops


An entry in a Midmer & Sons Ledger Book (for Siloam Presbyterian Church) shows that a motor was installed in 1921 on the Earle organ that had two manuals and 9 stops. Specifications of this organ have not yet been located.
               
Sources:
     Bridge and Tunnel Club web site: www.bridgeandtunnelclub.com
     Midmer & Sons Ledger Book. Entry (1921) for addition of motor on Earle & Co. organ. Courtesy Larry Trupiano.
     Ochse, Orpha. Austin Organs. Richmond: The Organ Historical Society, 2001.
     "Religious Notices," Brooklyn Eagle (Apr. 27, 1895).
     Rownd, Charles. Stoplist of Wicks Organ, Op. 2974 (1949).
     "Scientists Dedicate," Brooklyn Eagle (Oct. 10, 1897).

Illustrations:
     Bishop, John. Console of Wicks Organ, Op. 2974.
     Brooklyn Collection, Brooklyn Public Library. Exterior (1943) of First Church of Christ, Scientist, Dean Street.
     Brooklyn Collection, Brooklyn Public Library. Exterior (1937) of Fourth Church of Christ, Scientist.