St. Ann Catholic Church - Brooklyn, N.Y. (Brooklyn Eagle, 1911)
  Click on image to enlarge
St. Ann Catholic Church

251 Front Street at Gold Street
Brooklyn, N.Y. 11201




The Roman Catholic Parish of St. Anne was established by Bishop Loughlin in 1860, with the Rev. Bartholomew Gleeson as its first pastor. Although several sites were available, Bishop Laughlin wanted a particular plot on the southwest corner of Front and Gold streets but the owner was unwilling to sell his property for a Catholic church. To circumvent this restriction, Mr. Henry Breslin, a businessman in the neighborhood, purchased the property (at a lower price than had been offered by the bishop) and then conveyed the title to the bishop. Ground was broken on August 21, 1860, but construction proceded slowly due to the beginning of the Civil War. Built at a cost of $15,000 under the supervision of prolific church architect Patrick C. Keely, who lived in the neighborhood, the brick Gothic edifice measured 60 by 122 feet and had a tower 130 feet high. The first Mass in the completed church was celebrated on Christmas Day 1860, but the church was not dedicated until September 1861. A school was started in the basement, but a separate school building was opened in September 1872, under the care of Franciscan Brothers and the Sisters of St. Joseph.

The church was known as St. Anne until 1901, when the name was changed to St. Ann.

In 1986, St. Ann's Church was merged into St. George's Church, located at 203 York Street, and renamed St. Ann-St. George's Church. The old St. Ann's Church building was razed in 1992, and St. George's Church was ultimately closed and razed in 2007.
               
George Jardine & Sons
New York City (1891)
Mechanical action
2 manuals, 16 stops, 16 ranks


In 1891, a new organ was built by George Jardine & Sons of New York City. According to The Catholic Church in the United States (1911), Father James J. Durick, pastor, had a new organ installed in 1891 at a cost of $2,200, while the Brooklyn Eagle (May 24, 1891) reported the new organ would cost $3,000.

The following specification was recorded (Jan. 1916) by Louis F. Mohr & Co., an organ service concern in the area. Mohr noted that the organ was winded by a Kinetic blower. The fate of this organ is unknown.
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 58 notes
8
  Open Diapason
58
4
  Principal
58
8
  Gamba [TC]
46
4
  Flute Harmonic
58
8
  Melodia [TC]
46
2
  Fifteenth
58
8
  St. Diapason Bass
12
8
  Trumpet
58
               
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 58 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon [TC]
46
8
  St. Diapason Bass
12
8
  Open Diapason
58
4
  Violino
58
8
  Dulciana [TC]
12
2
  Flageolet
58
8
  Clarinet Flute [TC]
46
8
  Hautboy [TC]
46
               
Pedal Organ – 27 notes
16
  Bourdon
27
       
8
  Violoncello
27
       
               
Couplers ("4 couplers")
    [Great to Pedal]       [Swell to Great]  
    [Swell to Pedal]       [Swell to Great Octaves]  
               
Accessories
    Tremulant   2 Pedal Combinations
    Balanced Swell Pedal   Bellows Signal
               
Sources:
     The Catholic Church in the United States of America: Undertaken to Celebrate the Golden Jubilee of His Holiness, Pope Pius X, Vol. III. New York: The Catholic Editing Company, 1914.
     "Catholic Church Notes," Brooklyn Eagle (May 24, 1891). A new organ to cost $3,000.
     Mohr, Louis F. & Co. Specifications of George Jardine & Sons organ (1891). Courtesy Larry Trupiano.
     Nelson, George. Organs in the United States and Canada Database. Seattle, Wash.
     Stiles, Henry Reed. History of the City of Brooklyn: Including the Old Town and Village of Brooklyn, the Town of Bushwick, and the Village and City of Williamsburgh. 3 Volumes. Brooklyn: pub. by subscription, 1863.

Illustration:
     Brooklyn Eagle. (1911) photo of exterior. Brooklyn Collection, Brooklyn Public Library.