St. Anthony-St. Alphonsus Catholic Church - Brooklyn, NY
 
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Church of St. Anthony – St. Alphonsus
(Roman Catholic)

862 Manhattan Avenue at Milton Street
Brooklyn, N.Y. 11222


Organ Specifications:
862 Manhattan Avenue (since 1874)
III/45 Midmer-Losh Inc. (c.1924); reb. Konzelman (1980s)
• IV/ Reuben Midmer & Sons (1892)
• II/ Unknown (1885)
• Unknown (early 1880s)
• Henry Erben (1875) – repossessed (early 1880s)
Lower Church or Chapel:
II/3 Estey Organ Company, Op. 3091 (1938)
• II/ Reuben Midmer & Sons (<1917)
• I/ Reuben Midmer & Sons (1900)
• Henry Erben (1874)
India Street (1858-1874)
• unknown


St. Anthony-St. Alphonsus Catholic Church - Brooklyn, N.Y. (1907 postcard)  
1907 Postcard
 
The Roman Catholic parish of St. Antony of Padua, in the Greenpoint area of Brooklyn, was established in 1856. In 1874, Patrick C. Keeley of Brooklyn designed the present Gothic Revival church, which is constructed of red brick with white limestone trim, and features a 240-foot spire.

In 1975, St. Alphonsus Church was merged into St. Anthony Church, after which the church was renamed St. Anthony – St. Alphonsus Catholic Church.

In 1982, the Greenpoint Historic District was designated by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Committee. St. Anthony – St. Alphonsus Church is within this district.
               
Midmer-Losh Inc.
Merrick, N.Y. (1924 or 1927 or 1929)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 46 stops, ~45 ranks


Sometime in the 1920s, the Midmer-Losh organ company, successor in 1924 to Reuben Midmer & Sons, rebuilt the c.1902 four-manual organ by Reuben Midmer & Sons, retaining the slider chests. In the 1980s, the organ was again rebuilt by James A. Konzelman Organs of Bayonne, N.J. Konzelman releathered the pull-down action and stop action, and installed a new console. Following are the specifications of the Midmer-Losh organ as recorded in 1966 by Larry Trupiano of Brooklyn.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
16
  Open Diapason
61
4
  Octave
61
8
  Open Diapason
61
4
  Waldflute
61
8
  Second Open Diapason
61
2
  Flute Harmonique
61
8
  Clarabella
61
2
  Super Octave
61
8
  Doppel Flute
61
16
  Double Trumpet
61
8
  Gemshorn
61
8
  Trumpet
61
8
  Viola di Gamba
61
4
  Clarion
61
               
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon
61
4
  Principal
61
8
  Open Diapason
61
4
  Flauto Traverso
61
8
  Stopped Diapason
61
2
  Flageolet
61
8
  Quintadena
61
16
  Contra Fagotto
61
8
  Viol d'Orchestre
61
8
  Cornopean
61
8
  Salicional
61
8
  Oboe
61
8
  Vox Celeste [TC]
49
8
  Vox Humana
61
8
  Dolce d'Amour
61
    Tremulant  
               
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Lieblich Gedacht
61
4
  Flute d'Amour
61
8
  Open Diapason
61
4
  Violina
61
8
  Melodia
61
2
  Piccolo
61
8
  Keraluphon
61
8
  Clarinet
61
8
  Dulciana
61
    Tremulant  
8
  Unda Maris [TC]
49
       
               
Pedal Organ – 30 notes
32
  Bourdon [ext.?]
30
16
  Lieblich Gedacht
CH
16
  Open Diapason
30
8
  Violoncello
30
16
  Bourdon
30
16
  Trombone
30
16
  Dulciana
30
       
               
Couplers
    Swell to Pedal 8', 4'   Swell to Choir 16', 8', 4'
    Great to Pedal 8'   Great to Great 4'
    Choir to Pedal 8', 4'   Swell to Swell 16', 4', Unison Off
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'   Choir to Choir 16', 4' Unison Off
    Choir to Great 16', 8', 4'    
               
  Reuben Midmer and Sons Organ (1892) in St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church - Brooklyn, NY
Reuben Midmer & Sons
Brooklyn, N.Y. (1892)
Unknown action
4 manuals


In 1892, a new four-manual organ was installed by Reuben Midmer & Sons of Brooklyn. This organ was known as the "Columbus Organ" because it was erected in the Quadro-Centennial year of 1892. The organ had 3,330 pipes, and measured 35 feet wide, 30 feet deep, and 45 feet high. Two Ross water motors provided power to the bellows. The solemn inauguration of the organ took place during morning and evenings services on Sunday, November 6, 1892. Music was provided by the church choir, assisted by a quartette of eminent artists, led by Mr. Joseph A. Campbell, Musical Director and Organist. Specifications of this organ have not yet been located.
               
Unknown Builder
(c.1885)
Mechanical action


In the fall of 1885, a Mr. John Good directed Father O'Hare to have an organ built as his expense. Described as "a two-manual organ which did good service for years," the organ replaced the smaller instrument installed several years earlier. Specifications of this organ have not yet been located.
               
Unknown Builder
(early 1880s)


According to the Historical Sketch of St. Antony's Church (1897), after the 1875 Erben organ was removed, "an instrument, which was only a mere excuse for an organ, occupied the loft. Specifications of this organ have not yet been located.
               
Henry Erben
New York City (1875)
Mechanical action


The original organ in St. Antony of Padua was built in 1875 by Henry Erben of New York City. Due to "financial troubles in the early 1880s, the organ was removed and afterward sold by the maker" to Father McNulty, of St. John the Baptist Catholic Church, Paterson, N.J. Specifications of this organ have not yet been located.
               
Organ in the Lower Church:

Estey Organ Company
Brattleboro, Vt. – Opus 3091 (1938)
Electro-pneumatic key action
2 manuals, 21 stops, 3 ranks


This small three-rank unit organ was built by the Estey Organ Company and installed in the Lower Church. It had a detached console with celluloid keys, and "Oak finish as Birch." The Estey Shop Order states, "church seats 1200 therefore voice loud."
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon [A]
97
4
  Octave
B
8
  Diapason [B]
73
4
  Salicet
C
8
  Salicional [C]
73
4
  Flute
A
8
  Gedeckt
A
2
  Piccolo
A
               
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon
A
4
  Salicet
C
8
  Diapason
B
4
  Flute d'Amour
A
8
  Salicional
C
2 2/3
  Twelfth
A
8
  Gedeckt
A
2
  Piccolo
A
4
  Octave
B
    Tremulant  
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon
A
8
  Salicional
C
8
  Diapason
B
8
  Flute
A
               
Pedal Movements
    Balanced Swell Pedal      
    Balanced Crescendo Pedal      
               
Organ in the Chapel (possibly Lower Church):

Reuben Midmer and Sons
Brooklyn or Merrick, N.Y. (before 1917)
Unknown action
2 manuals


Specifications of this organ have not yet been located.
               
Organ in the Chapel (possibly Lower Church):

Reuben Midmer & Sons
Brooklyn or Merrick, N.Y. (1900)
Unknown action
1 manual


Specifications of this organ have not yet been located.
               
Organ in the Lower Church:

Henry Erben
New York City (1874)
Mechanical action


This organ by Henry Erben was probably installed in the Lower Church, which was used for services until the main church was ready. Specifications of this organ have not yet been located.
               
Sources:
     "A Triduum to St. Anthony," The Brooklyn Eagle (June 11, 1893).
     Carnahan, John. Factory Shop Order for Estey Organ, Op. 3091 (1938).
     Dolkart, Andrew S. and Matthew A. Postal. Guide to New York City Landmarks (Third Edition). New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2004.
     The Estey Pipe Organ web site: www.esteyorgan.com
     Goldberger, Paul. "Metropolitan Baedeker; Greenpoint, Still an Urban, Ethnic Village," The New York Times (Mar. 1, 1985).
     Hellman, Peter. "Old-World Poland With an East River View," The New York Times (Jan. 6, 1995).
     Historical Sketch of The Church of St. Antony of Padua, Brooklyn, N.Y., with an Account of the Rectorship of Rev. P. F. O'Hare, Published on the Occasion of His Silver Jubilee, March 19, 1897. Pub. by the church, 1897.
     Nelson, George. Organs in the United States and Canada Database. Seattle, Wash.
     "St. Anthony's – Dedication of the New Church in Greenpoint," The Brooklyn Eagle ( June 14, 1875).
     "St. Anthony's R.C. Church Consecrated by Bishop," The Brooklyn Eagle (Dec. 22, 1902).
     Trupiano, Larry. Specifications of the Midmer-Losh organ.

Illustrations:
     Historical Sketch of The Church of St. Anthony of Padua, Brooklyn, N.Y.
     New York Architecture Images web site: http://www.nyc-architecture.com/GPT/gpt021.htm