1908 postcard of the South Reformed Church - Brooklyn, NY
 
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Twelfth Street Reformed Church

251 Twelfth Street, between Fourth & Fifth Avenues
Brooklyn, N.Y. 11215


Organ Specifications:
251 Twelfth Street, betw. Fourth & Fifth Aves. (1869-1968)
II/22 M.P. Möller, Inc., Op. 1278 (1911)
• II/24reg E. & G.G. Hook, Op. 502 (1869)
Third Avenue, betw. 20th & 21st Streets (1850-1869)
• I/ Ferris & Stuart (1866)



The Twelfth Street Reformed Church was originally known as the North Church of Gowanus. The property of this congregation, consisting of an edifice and eight lots located on the Third Avenue between Twentieth and Twenty-first streets, was purchased by the consistory of the South Reformed Dutch Church, in May 1842, from the Fourth Presbyterian church of Brooklyn, and was locally known as the North Church of Gowanus. Both congregations were under the ministrations of the same pastor, Rev. S. M. Woodbridge, and worshiped in the two church edifices alternately, until January 29, 1850, when the south classis of Long Island dissolved the union, and organized the North church congregation as the North Reformed Dutch church of Gowanus, who purchased the property from the consistory of the South Reformed Dutch church, most of the members of the new organization being dismissed, on their own application, from the old to connect themselves with the new.

Early in 1869, the property owned by the church on Third Avenue, near Twenty-first Street, was sold and a new church edifice erected on Twelfth street, between Fourth and Fifth Avenues. Built of brick with stone trimmings, the building measured 55 by 85 feet and cost about $50,000. At this time, the corporate title of the society was changed from "The Reformed Protestant Dutch Church of North Gowanus," to "The Twelfth Street Reformed Church, Brooklyn."

This congregation disbanded in 1968, and the building was acquired by the Park Slope Community Church, a Baptist congregation.

               
M.P. Möller, Inc.
Hagerstown, Md. – Opus 1278 (1911)
Tubular-pneumatic action
2 manuals, 24 stops, 22 ranks


The Agreement (June 26, 1911) between M.P. Möller and the Twelfth Street Reformed Church shows that Möller would build a two-manual organ for the sum of $4,500, less an allowance of $1,000 for the old organ. Möller provided casing of walnut wood, and a detached console. R. Huntington Woodman, organist of First Presbyterian Church, played what may have been the opening recital on November 30, 1911.
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes
16
  Bourdon
61
4
  Octave
61
8
  Open Diapason
61
4
  Flute d'Amour
61
8
  Dulciana
61
2
  Super Octave
61
8
  Viola di Gamba
61
8
  Harmonique Tuba
61
8
  Doppel Floete
61
       
               
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Open Diapason
73
4
  Flauto Traverso
73
8
  Stopped Diapason
73
4
  Violina
73
8
  Salicional
73
8
  Oboe
73
8
  Aeoline
73
8
  Cornopean
73
8
  Voix Celeste [TC]
61
8
 
Vox Humana
61
8
  Quintadena
73
       
               
Pedal Organ – 30 notes
16
  Open Diapason [unit]
42
8
  Octave [ext.]
16
  Bourdon [unit]
42
8
  Flute [ext.]
               
Couplers
    Swell to Pedal 8'       Great 4'  
    Great to Pedal 8'       Swell 16', 4', Unison
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'          
               
Mechanicals
    Tremulant   Crescendo Indicator
    Wind Indicator    
               
Adjustable Combination Pistons
    Pistons No. 1-2-3 affecting Swell & Pedal stops  
    Pistons No. 1-2-3 affecting Great & Pedal stops  
       
Pedal Movements
    Great to Pedal Reversible    
    Balanced Swell Pedal    
    Grand Crescendo Pedal  
    6 Pedal Pistons (duplicating manual pistons)  
               
Accessories
    Blower
             
E. & G.G. Hook
Boston, Mass. – Opus 502 (1869)
Mechanical action
2 manuals, 24 registers


The original organ for Twelfth Street Reformed Church was built in 1869 by E. & G.G. Hook of Boston. Correspondence dated Nov. 23, 1911, shows that M.P. Möller moved this organ (as opus 1344) to the Provincial School (St. Joseph's Seraphic Seminary) in Callicoon, N.Y., for a consideration of $1,000. Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
             
Organ in church located on Third Avenue:

Ferris & Stuart
New York City
Mechanical action
1 manual


The original church building had an organ built in 1866 by Ferris & Stuart of New York City. Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
               
Sources:
     "Thanksgiving Day in Brooklyn Churches," The Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Nov. 29, 1911). Recital by R. Huntington Woodward.
     M.P. Möller Agreement (June 26, 1911) with specifications of M.P. Möller organ, Op. 1278. Courtesy Larry Trupiano.
     M.P. Möller Agreement (Nov. 23, 1911) to move E. & G.G. Hook organ (Op. 502) to the Provincial School, Callicoon, N.Y. Courtesy Larry Trupiano.
     Nelson, George. Organs in the United States and Canada Database. Seattle, Wash.
     Stiles, Henry Reed. History of the City of Brooklyn: Including the Old Town and Village of Brooklyn, the Town of Bushwick, and the Village and City of Williamsburgh. 3 Volumes. Brooklyn: pub. by subscription, 1863.

Illustration:
     Brooklyn Eagle (1953). Exterior. Brooklyn Collection, Brooklyn Public Library.