St. James Episcopal Church, Fordham - Bronx, N.Y.
 
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The Church of St. James, Fordham
(Episcopal)

2500 Jerome Avenue at 190th Street
Bronx, N.Y. 10468
http://stjamesf.dioceseny.org/


Organ Specifications:
• Acutone electronic
III/22 J.H. & C.S. Odell, Op. 582 (1928)
II/16 Wm. H. Davis (1865)
• William H. Davis (1860) – possibly 2nd hand reed organ


Original (1854) St. James Episcopal Church - Fordham Manor (Bronx), New York  
St. James' Church, Fordham, was incorporated on July 26, 1853, and although a Certificate of Incorporation was drawn up and registered in the Westchester County Clerk's Office on September 5, 1853, a technical error was discovered and a new one was prepared for registration two years later, on September 25, 1855. In a very short time a Sunday School of one hundred children was formed, more than justifying the creation of a new parish. The vestry made arrangements to use the Manor Reformed Church on Kingsbridge Road for services on Sunday afternoons, but were unable to renew the privilege on the expiration of the lease. Not far away, an old district school house was for sale. The vestry paid ninety dollars for the building and another eighty-five dollars to make it suitable for church services. On Sunday, June 11, 1854, in this tiny structure, St. James' Church, Fordham, became the first Protestant Episcopal Church in the Manor of Fordham. For several months the Parish was dependent upon visiting clergymen or lay readers as "much difficulty was experienced in securing the attendance of efficient ministers to perform the services." The little church was then moved to a lot bought previously, by the vestry, for a permanent site and a cemetery.

As the membership increased in number, the need arose for a larger and more suitable church. Plans were drawn up by Henry M. Dudley, one of the leading Gothic Revival church architects of the mid-19th century, and on May 28, 1864, Bishop Horatio Potter laid the cornerstone for the present building. Built from 1864-65 at a cost of $25,000, the church was constructed of native fieldstone with red sandstone trim, wood and slate. On All Saints' Day, November 1, 1865, the completed church was consecrated by Bishop Potter, and the Rev. Morgan Dix, Rector of Trinity Church, New York, preached the sermon.

Parish House of St. James Episcopal Church - Fordham Manor (Bronx), New York  
For some years since the completion of the new church building the members had been using the old wooden structure as a Sunday School. By 1889, the vestry noted that the old building was “in such a state of decay that it is doubtful if it can be used for another winter, making a parish building one of absolute necessity.” Architect Henry Kilburn was commissioned to design the parish house which was to extend from the north of the church. A major portion of Kilburn’s work involved churches, two of the finest being the West Park Presbyterian Church at West 86th Street, and the West End Presbyterian Church at West 105th, both on Amsterdam Avenue in Manhattan. For St. James, Kilburn designed a Gothic Revival structure that blends perfectly with the original church building. The parish house, built from 1891-92 at a cost of approximately $19,000, has a rock-faced stone facade and a recessed porch with pointed-arch openings supported by boldly carved foliate capitals.

St. James Episcopal Church and Parish House were designated in 1980 by the New York City Landmarks Preservation Committee.
               
Acutone Organ
Massapequa, N.Y.
Electronic tone production


Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
               
J.H. & C.S. Odell & Co.
New York City – Opus 582 (1928)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 24 stops, 22 ranks


The Odell organ was built for the church's first building, and was moved to the present building with no apparent change. Located to the left of the platform, the organ was behind a three-sectioned case, and there is a matching case to the right. The console was recessed, and there was a reversible Swell to Great piston in the Swell keyslip.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
8
  Open Diapason
73
4
  Octave
73
8
  Gamba
73
4
  Flute Harmonic
73
8
  Dulciana
73
8
 
Trumpet
73
8
  Doppel Flute
73
   
Chimes
20 bars
 
     
 
     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon
73
4
  Rohr Flute
73
8
  Violin Diapason
73
8
  Oboe
73
8
  Salicional
73
8
  Vox Humana
73
8
  Vox Celeste [TC]
61
    Tremolo  
8
  Stopped Diapason
73
       
               
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Viole d'Orchestre
73
4
 
Flute d'Amour
73
8
  Melodia
73
2
 
Piccolo Harmonic
61
8
 
Geigen
preparation
8
  Clarinet
73
8
 
Dulciana
preparation
    Tremolo  
8
 
Unda Maris [TC]
preparation
       
 
     
 
     
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
16
  Open Diapason
32
16
  Bourdon
SW
16
  Sub Bass
32
8
  Stille Gedacht
SW
               
Couplers
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'       Choir to Choir 16', 4'  
    Choir to Great 16', 8', 4'       Great to Pedal 8'  
    Swell to Choir 8'       Swell to Pedal 8'  
    Great to Great 16', 4'       Choir to Pedal 8'  
    Swell to Swell 16', 4'       Pedal to Pedal 8'  
               
Adjustable Combinations
    Pistons No. 1-2-3-4 affecting Swell Stops
    Pistons No. 1-2-3-4 affecting Great Stops
    Pistons No. 1-2 affecting Choir Stops
               
Accessories
    Balanced Swell Pedal     Great to Pedal Reversible
    Balanced Choir Pedal     Sforzando Pedal
    Crescendo Pedal        
               
  1910 Interior - St. James Episcopal Church, Fordham - Bronx, N.Y.
William H. Davis
New York City (1865)
Mechanical manual action
Tubular-pneumatic pedal action
2 manuals, 16 stops, 16 ranks


The following specifications were recorded by Louis F. Mohr & Co., an organ service firm in the area. Mohr noted that the organ occupied a space 12 feet deep (plus 18 inches for the pedals), 8 feet wide, and 18 feet high (Pedals higher). The William H. Davis organ, located in a chamber on the left side of the chancel, can be seen in the photo at right.
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 56 notes
8
  Open Diapason
56
4
  Wald Flute [TC]
44
8
  Gamba Bass
12
4
  Principal
56
8
  Gamba [TC]
44
3
  Twelfth
56
8
  St. Diapason Bass
12
2
  Fifteenth
56
8
  St. Diapason Treble [TC]
44
8
  Trumpet
56
 
     
 
     
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 56 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon Bass
12
8
  St. Diapason Bass
12
16
  Bourdon Treble [TC]
44
8
  St. Diapason Treble [TC]
44
8
  Open Diapason
44
4
  Principal Bass
12
8
  Salicional
56
4
  Principal Treble [TC]
44
8
  Dulciana [TC]
44
2
  Piccolo
56
               
Pedal Organ – 30 notes
16
  Open Diapason
30
       
               
Couplers

    Great to Swell          
    Pedal to Swell          
    Pedal to Great          
               
William H. Davis
New York City (1860)


This organ may have been a second-hand reed organ. Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
               
Sources:
     American Organ Archives, Organ Historical Society, Princeton, N.J. Specifications of J.H. & C.S. Odell Organ, Op. 582 (1928). Courtesy Jonathan Bowen.
     Among the Elms of Fordham: The Sesquicentennial Historical Gazette of Saint James Episcopal Church in the Manor of Fordham, the Bronx, New York. 1853–2003. Bronx: St. James Episcopal Church, 2003.
     Mohr, Louis F. & Co. Specifications of William H. Davis organ (1865). Courtesy Larry Trupiano.
     Nelson, George. Organs in the United States and Canada Database. Seattle, Wash.
     St. James Episcopal Church web site: http://stjamesf.dioceseny.org/
     Trupiano, Larry. Addendum and corrections (as of 1969) to stoplist of J.H. & C.S. Odell Organ, Op. 582 (1928).

Illustrations:
     Among the Elms of Fordham. Original church; exterior; 1910 interior; parish house.