All Souls Episcopal Church - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
 
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All Souls Church
(Episcopal)

88 St. Nicholas Avenue at 114th Street
New York, N.Y. 10026


Organ Specifications:
88 St. Nicholas Avenue at 114th Street (since 1905)
II/ Allen Organ Company – Model TC-3S (1970s)
III/34 George S. Hutchings, Op. 1627 (1907)
II/15 Estey Organ Company, Op. 209 (1905)
775 Madison Avenue at 66th Street (1889-1905)
III/37 J.H. & C.S. Odell, Op. 283 (1890)
III/34 Hilborne L. Roosevelt, Op. 149 (1883)
139 West 48th Street (1861-1889)
• Henry Erben (1861)


Original All Souls Episcopal Church - New York City (1908, Library of Congress)  
1908 view of Original Church  
All Souls Protestant Episcopal Church was established on October 8, 1859, as a mission of St. Mark's-in-the-Bouwerie Church. Two years later, in 1861, a Romanesque-style church was built at 139 West 48th Street, near Sixth Avenue, and the mission was elevated to church status. The church was known as the "Anthon Memorial Church" in memory of the Rev. Henry Anthon, D.D. (1795-1861), beloved rector for 30 years at St. Mark's-in-the-Bouwerie. The congregation remained at this location for the next three decades. In 1896, the church building on West 48th Street was acquired by the First Church of Christ, Scientist, who remained until 1903, after which it became the Studebaker Garage for automobiles.

In 1889, the Rev. Dr. R. Heber Newton, the popular rector of All Souls, effected a merger with the Episcopal Church of the Holy Spirit, located at Madison Avenue and East 66th Street. Holy Spirit Church had erected a Romanesque Revival edifice just a few years earlier, in 1881-83, as designed by R. H. Robertson, but the church was in decline as many of its members had moved away from the area. Upon the merger, the rector of Holy Spirit retired, All Souls Church transfered its name to the new location, and Dr. Newton was retained as the rector.

  All Souls Episcopal Church - New York City
  Madison Avenue at 66th Street
The church on Madison Avenue thrived for several years, but following the departure of Dr. Newton as rector the congregation dwindled. In 1905, the Bishop and Standing Committee gave permission to dissolve the parish, and the building on Madison Avenue was sold to a parishioner for $250,000, who then erected an apartment house on the site. It was proposed that the proceeds of the sale be used by Bishop Greer for his work in the Bronx. The vestry of All Souls, however, thought they should have a say in how the money was distributed, and proposed that only $50,000 be used for church work in the Bronx, with the remainder going to the struggling Church of the Archangel in Harlem, whose new building at 88 St. Nicholas Street had burned down the day before it was to open in 1903. Bishop Greer decided to consolidate the All Souls and Archangel congregations under the name of All Souls Church. The sale proceeds were used to pay off Archangel's debt and to construct a new church on the St. Nicholas Avenue location, designed by Janes & Leo, in 1908.

All Souls Episcopal Church - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)  
By the 1920s, the demographics of Harlem changed when a large number of blacks, many of Caribbean origin, left their former neighborhoods in Greenwich Village and Midtown, and moved uptown. White residents resisted, and many churches closed or relocated. The Rev. Rollin Dodd, rector of All Souls Church since 1929, provided programs and services for black Episcopalians, and by 1932, about half of those attending services were black, with another 200 black children attending its Sunday School. The vestry ordered Rev. Dodd to cease encouraging the Negroes, and when he refused, they insisted that he resign and then stopped his salary. When this failed, the vestry erected scaffolding, declaring that the ceiling might fall at any moment, and closed the church by changing the locks. Bishop William T. Manning defended the rector's stance, and announced that he would preach at All Souls. The vestry threatened to keep him out by legal means, to which Bishop Manning said, "I shall be there." On the following Sunday, Bishop Manning arrived at the church, where he found the rector, superintendent, twelve policemen and a large crowd waiting. The bishop demanded the keys, and when the superintendent said he had none, asked, "Shall we break in?" While the bishop waited, the locks were removed, then the bishop went inside and preached firmly on the rights of the rector to serve his neighborhood. "I request, and as Bishop I instruct, that this church...shall be open for services at such times as he shall direct," and declared that the church would be open "to all the people in the neighborhood who wish to attend its services, without distinction of race or color."
             
Allen Organ Company
Macungie, Penn. – Model TC-3S (1970s)
Electronic tonal production
2 manuals, 32 stops


The present organ at All Souls Church is an Allen Organ Company electronic Model TC-3S, a line that was created in 1968. The console of this organ is located on the nave floor between the pulpit and pews.
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, expressive

16
  Double Diapason  
2 2/3
  Nazard  
8
  Open Diapason  
2
  Super Octave  
8
  Rohrflöte  
2
  Chimney Flute  
4
  Octave  
8
  Clarinet  
4
  Koppelflöte  
8
  Trumpet  

 

     

 

     
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, expressive
16
  Lieblich Gedeckt  
2
  Piccolo  
8
  Diapason  
1 1/3
  Larigot  
8
  Flute  
1
  Fife  
4
  Octave  
16
  Fagotto  
4
  Flute  
8
  Trompette  
2 2/3
  Nazard  
4
  Clarion  
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes, expressive
32
  Resultant  
8
  Flute  
16
  Principal  
5 1/3
  Quint  
16
  Bourdon  
4
  Octave  
16
  Lieblich Gedeckt  
16
  Bombarde  
8
  Principal  
8
  Trumpet  
               
General
    Celeste Strings   Flutes Softer
    Diapasons become Viola   Tremolo
    Diapasons become Dulciana   Flute Tremolo
    Reeds Solo    
               
Combination Pistons
    5 Preset Pistons
               
Accessories
    Expression Pedal    
    Crescendo Pedal and Indicator    
               
  W.W. Kimball Organ (1907) in All Souls Episcopal Church - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
   
  Chancel of All Souls Episcopal Church - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
   
George S. Hutchings
Boston, Mass. – Opus 1627 (1907)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 35 stops, 34 ranks






The original organ in the present church building is extant but unplayable. Its pipes are in two chambers, one on either side of the chancel. Some sources state that this organ was built by W.W. Kimball of Chicago, but an inspection (Feb. 7, 2010) of the chambers did not find supporting evidence. In two places, however, the number "1627" was found, and it now seems probable that this organ was in fact built by George S. Hutchings of Boston; that opus number would be current around the year 1907.

At some point, a new three-manual stop-key console was installed, but there is no nameplate. On the wall next to the console is a small plaque stating, "Specification by Daniel R. Philippi, Anno Domini 1907." Mr. Philippi was the organist & choirmaster of All Souls Church until 1913 when he became assistant organist at St. Thomas Church. In the basement is a c.1970s Ventus blower by Aug. Laukhauff.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
8
  First Open Diapason
61
4
  Octave
61
8
  Second Open Diapason
61
4
  Harmonic Flute
61
8
  Great Flute [Gross Flöte]
61
8
  Trumpet
61
8
  Gamba
61
   
Chimes [Mayland]
25 tubes

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon
61
4
  Octave
61
8
  Diapason
61
4
  Chimney Flute
61
8
  Horn Diapason
61
2
  Flautino
61
8
  Stopped Flute
61
    Mixture III ranks
183
8
  Quintadena
61
8
  Cornopean
61
8
  Salicional
61
8
  Oboe
61
8
  Voix Celeste [TC]
49
8
  Vox Humana
61
8
  Aeoline
61
    Tremolo  
               
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Diapason
61
4
  Flauto Traverso
61
8
  Concert Flute
61
2
  Piccolo
61
8
  Dulciana
61
8
  Clarinet
61
8
  Unda Maris [TC]
49
    Tremolo  

     

 
 
Pedal Organ – 32 notes (30-note ranks)
32
  Sub Bass [resultant]
16
  Bourdon
42
16
  Open Diapason
30
16
  Lieblich Gedeckt
SW
16
  Violone
30
8
  Flute
               
Couplers
    Great to Pedal 8', 4'   Swell to Choir 16', 8', 4'
    Swell to Pedal 8', 4'   Great 16', Unison Off, 4'
    Choir to Pedal 8'   Swell 16', Unison Off, 4'
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'   Choir 16', Unison Off, 4'
    Choir to Great 16', 8', 4'    
             
Adjustable Combinations
   
Swell & Pedal Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb)
Great & Pedal Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb)
Choir & Pedal Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb)
Full Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb)
  General Cancellor (thumb)
  Divisional Cancellors – name plates above stops of each division
             
Pedal Movements
    Balanced Swell Pedal   Great to Pedal Reversible
    Balanced Choir Pedal   Sforzando Reversible
    Register Crescendo Pedal    
         
Accessories
    Sforzando Indicator Light    
    Crescendo Indicator Light    
               
Organ built for Church of the Archangel at present location:

Estey Organ Company
Brattleboro, Vt. – Opus 209 (1905)
Tubular?-pneumatic action
2 manuals, 15 stops, 15 ranks


Estey's Op. 209 was built in 1905 for the Church of the Archangel. Pipecounts below are suggested, based on other Estey organs of the era. This organ was moved to the First Reformed Church, Little Falls, N.Y.
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes
8
  Open Diapason
61
8
  Melodia
61
8
  Viola di Gamba
61
4
  Principal
61
8
  Dulciana
61
4
  Flute d'Amour
61

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon Treble [TC]
49
8
  Stopped Diapason
61
16
  Bourdon Bass
12
8
  Bassoon
12
8
  Violin Diapason
61
8
  Oboe [TC]
49
8
  Salicional *
61
8
  Cornopean
61
8
  Vox Celeste [TC]
49
    Tremolo  

     

 
* "Voice Salicional very soft"
Pedal Organ – 30 notes
16
  Open Diapason
30
       
16
  Bourdon
30
       
               
Couplers
    Great to Pedal       Swell to Great
    Swell to Pedal       Swell to Great 4'
               
Organ in All Souls Church located at 775 Madison Avenue:

J.H. & C.S. Odell
New York City – Opus 283 (1890)
Tubular-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 32 stops, 37 ranks


The J.H. & C.S. Odell organ installed at All Souls Church was instituted during a festive service on Sunday evening, November 16, 1890. Will C. Macfarlane, organist of the church, played Bach's Prelude and Fugue in A minor and Toccata in F, Handel's Largo, and Guilmant's Sonata in D minor. A 60-voice chorus comprised of the All Souls vested choir of mixed voices, assisted by the soloists and chorus choir of St. Bartholomew's Church, presented a variety of anthems by Tallis, Barnby, Gounod and Mendelssohn. Many people were unable to gain admission to the church.

In 1905, All Souls Church relocated to Harlem and their Madison Avenue property and building were sold to a parishioner. The Odell organ was sold to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre (now Church of the Resurrection) on Seventy-fourth Street, where it was installed by the W.W. Kimball Co.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 58 notes
16
  Double Open Diapason
58
4
  Octave
58
8
  Open Diapason
58
2 2/3
  Twelfth
58
8
  Viola di Gamba
58
2
  Fifteenth
58
8
  Grosse Flöte
58
    Mixture, 4 ranks
232
8
  Hohl Flöte
58
8
  Trumpet [harm. treble]
58

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 58 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon
58
4
  Flute Harmonique
58
8
  Open Diapason
58
2
  Flageolet
58
8
  Salicional
58
    Cornet, 3 ranks
174
8
  Stopped Diapason
58
8
  Vox Humana
58
8
  Dolce
58
8
  Cornopean [harm. treble]
58
8
  Vox Celestis
58
8
  Oboe
58
4
  Octave
58
       

     

     
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 58 notes
8
  Violin Open Diapason
58
4
  Rohr Flöte
58
8
  Dulciana
58
2
  Piccolo
58
8
  Concert Flute
58
8
  Clarinet
58

     

     
Pedal Organ – 30 notes
16
  Double Open Diapason
30
8
  Violoncello
30
16
  Bourdon
30
       
               
Couplers
    Swell to Great       Swell to Pedal  
    Swell to Great Octaves     Choir to Pedal  
    Choir to Great       Reversible, Swell to Great
    Swell to Choir       Reversible, Great to Pedal
    Great to Pedal          
               
Pedal Movements
    Pedal Organ Forte     Full Organ Pedal, Great & Swell
    Pedal Organ Piano     Piano Organ Great & Swell
           
Mechanical Accessories
    Swell Tremulant     Wind Indicator
    Bellows Signal     Balance Swell Pedal
               
Odell Patent Pneumatic Compositions (hand pistons)
    Great Organ   Swell Organ
    1. Full Organ   1. Full Choir
    2. Full to Mixture   2. Full to Oboe
    3. Full to Fifteenth   3. Full to Flageolet
    4. Full to Octave   4. Full to Octave
    5. Open, Gamba, & Doppel Flöte [sic]   5. Open, St. Diap., and Salicional
    6. Gamba and Doppel Flöte [sic]   6. Stopped Diapason, and Salicional
    7. Gamba   7. Dolce
    8. Hohl Flöte   8. Flute Traverso
               
Organ built for Church of the Holy Spirit at 775 Madison Avenue:

Hilborne L. Roosevelt
New York City – Opus 149 (1883)
Tracker-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 32 stops, 34 ranks


For their new building on Madison Avenue, the Church of the Holy Spirit contracted with Hilborne L. Roosevelt to move the two-manual, 18-stop organ built in 1878 by J.H. & C.S. Odell (Op. 161) for their previous church at 123 East 57th Street. Roosevelt enlarged the organ to three manuals for a consideration of $8,000.

In 1890, the Roosevelt organ was replaced by a new three-manual organ built by J.H. & C.S. Odell (Op. 283). In 1892, Odell sold and moved the Roosevelt organ to St. Patrick's Church, Columbus, Ohio, where it was rebuilt to serve in its new location at a cost of $3,600.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 56 notes
8
  Open Diapason
56
4
  Principal
56
8
  Keraulophon [1-12 grooved]
56
4
  Flute [TC]
44
8
  Viola di Gamba
56
2
  Fifteenth
56
8
  Stopped Diapason
56
8
  Trumpet
56
8
  Clarabella [1-12 grooved]
56
       

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 56 notes, enclosed
16
  Open Diapason [TC]
44
4
  Flute Harmonique
56
8
  Open Diapason
56
2 2/3
  Octave Quint
56
8
  Stopped Diapason
56
2
  Super Octave
56
8
  Salicional [1-12 grooved]
56
    Cornet 3 ranks
168
8
  Dolce
56
8
  Cornopean
56
4
  Octave
56
8
  Oboe [TC]
44
               
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 56 notes, enclosed
16
  Lieblich Gedeckt [TC]
44
4
  Fugara
56
8
  Open Diapason
56
2 2/3
  Twelfth
56
8
  Dulciana
56
2
  Piccolo
56
8
  Stopped Diapason
56
8
  Clarionette [TC]
44
               
Pedal Organ – 25 notes
16
  Open Diapason
25
8
  Violoncello *
25
16
  Bourdon
25
   
* later changed to 8' Quint
               
Couplers
    Swell to Great       Swell to Pedal  
    Swell to Great Octaves       Great to Pedal  
    Choir to Great       Choir to Pedal  
    Swell to Choir          
               
Mechanical Accessories
    Swell Tremulant   Bellows Signal
   
Eclipse Wind Indicator
               
Pedal Movements
    Great Organ Forte   Great to Pedal Reversible
    Great Organ Piano   Balanced Swell Pedal
    Swell Organ Forte   Balanced Choir Pedal
    Swell Organ Piano    
             
Organ built for the Anthon Memorial Church at 139 West 48th Street

Henry Erben
New York City (1861)
Mechanical action


This organ was located on the ground floor on the left side of the chancel. Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
               
Sources:
     "A Festival Service Performed on the Fine New Organ at All Souls' Church," The New York Times (Nov. 17, 1890).
     "Anthon Memorial Church; Rev. R. Heber Newton's Congregation," The New York Times (Dec. 7, 1874).
     "Bishop and Locksmith," Time Magazine (Oct. 31, 1932).
     The Church Journal (Apr. 17, 1861). Description of the Anthon Memorial Church. Courtesy Wayne Kempton.
     Church of the Resurrection, New York City. Vestry Minutes (October 1905) concerning purchase of J.H. & C.S. Odell organ, Op. 283 (1890). Courtesy David Enlow.
     "Dr. Newton's Church Closed Once For All," The New York Times (Dec. 4, 1905).
     Dunlap, David W. From Abyssinian to Zion: A Guide to Manhattan's Houses of Worship. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004.
     Hickman, Cynthia. Harlem Churches at the End of the 20th Century. New York: Dunbar Press, 2001.
     Lewis, James. Specifications of Estey Organ, Op. 209 (1905).
     Nelson, George. Organs in the United States and Canada Database. Seattle, Wash.
     "The Old Church Deserted," The New York Times (Nov. 18, 1889).
    Trupiano, Larry. Articles of Agreement (Jan. 2, 1892) by J.H. & C.S. Odell with specifications of Hilborne L. Roosevelt Organ, Op. 149 (1883).
    Trupiano, Larry. Factory Specifications for J.H. & C.S. Odell Organ, Op. 283 (1890).

Illustrations:
     King, Moses. Handbook of New York City: An Outline History & Description of the American Metropolis. Boston: Moses King, 1892. All Souls Church on Madison Avenue.
     Lawson, Steven E. Exterior. Interior; organ console.
     Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Online. 1908 view of Studebaker Garage (original church building).