All Souls Unitarian Church - New York City (Photo: John Rust)

 

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Unitarian Church of All Souls
(Unitarian Universalist)

1157 Lexington Avenue at 80th Street
New York, N.Y. 10021
http://www.allsoulsnyc.org


Organ Specifications:
1157 Lexington Avenue at 80th Street (since 1932)
III/53 Holtkamp Organ Company, Op. 2016 (1989)
• III/ Austin Organs Inc. (1970s); rev. Op. 1707
III/37 Austin Organ Company, Op. 1707 (1932)
249 Fourth Avenue at 20th Street (1855-1932)
III/40 Ferris & Stuart (1856)
548 Broadway near Spring Street (1845-1855)
• III/33 E. & G.G. Hook, Op. 65 (1844)
Chambers Street (1821-1845)
II/17 Thomas Appleton, Op. 17 (1827)


Church of the Divine Unity - New York City (Putnam's Monthly, Sept. 1853)  
Church of the Divine Unity  
The Unitarian Universalist society known today as All Souls Church was founded in 1819 as the "First Congregational Church in the City of New York." The first church, built from 1820-21 and located on Chambers Street between the Broad Way and Church Street, was dedicated on January 21, 1821. A new church was built in 1845 on Broadway, near Spring Street, and the congregation voted to call itself "The Church of the Divine Unity."

  All Souls Unitarian Church aka the Church of the Holy Zebra - New York City
  Church of the Holy Zebra (c.1855)
Following the northerly movement of residents, the society moved to a new church on southeast corner of Fourth Avenue (now Park Avenue South) and 20th Street. Built from 1853-55, the new edifice was designed by Jacob Wrey Mould. One prominent architectural critic pronounced it "the most unfortunate ecclesiastical edifice ever to be erected not only in New York, but anywhere else in the world for that matter." In fashioning the first major example of Byzantine Revival architecture in the United States, the architect employed two radically different kinds of brick, the reddest possible Philadelphia brick and a light yellow brick (Caen stone) from Italy. He juxtaposed the two in broad alternating stripes from top to bottom. Hence the church's nicknames: the Beefsteak Church, and, soon thereafter, the Church of the Holy Zebra. All Souls Church would influence Leopold Eidlitz, architect of the Church of the Holy Trinity (Episcopal) on Madison Avenue and Temple Emanu-El on East 43rd Street.

By the 1920s, the congregation sought to move uptown, and in the Spring of 1929 sold its Fourth Avenue property for $475,000 to an investment developer. Land was purchased on the southeast corner of Lexington Avenue and 80th Street and plans were drawn for a new church that would cost $1.25 million. In the interim, the congregation worshiped in the MacDowell Club at 166 East 73rd Street. With the onset of the Depression, the purchaser of the old property defaulted and the property reverted to the congregation. Luckily, the son of the late George F. Baker, a banker and philanthropist who had been a trustee of the church for more than half a century, arranged to cover the interest on the loan taken out for the new church. On August 23, 1931, the old landmark church was destroyed by fire.

The present church was designed by Hobart Upjohn, Richard Upjohn's grandson, and was built from 1931 to 1932. Upjohn's austere interpretation of the Georgian style is noted for its crisp geometry with few traditional details, and at the time of its construction symbolized an openness to non-Gothic architecture. A prominent feature of Upjohn's design is the noble tower that rises from a rectangular base to a square lantern with an octagonal steeple. The new church was dedicated on Sunday, November 13, 1932.
           
 

Holtkamp Organ (1989) at All Souls Unitarian Church - New York City (Photo: John Rust)

Holtkamp Organ Company
Cleveland, Ohio – Opus 2016 (1989)
Mechanical key action
Electric stop and combination action
3 manuals, 40 stops, 53 ranks




The 1989 Holtkamp organ is installed at the rear of the gallery, in direct line of sight and sound to the sanctuary, with surround space for choir and small orchestra. The exposed pipework has a 16' Principal tower of three pipes decorated in deep gold with decorative appliqué of metal plates. Mechanical key action was used throughout except for the 16' Principal and 16' Subbass.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
16
  Pommer
61
2
  Superoctave
61
8
  Principal
61
    Mixture IV ranks
244
8
  Gedackt
61
 
  Scharf III ranks
183
4
  Octave
61
8
  Trumpet
61
4
  Spitzflöte
61
 
     

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Gamba
61
1 1/3
  Larigot
61
8
  Voix Celeste [GG]
54
    Plein Jeu IV ranks
244
8
  Rohrgedackt
61
16
  Dulzian
61
4
  Geigen Principal
61
8
  Oboe
61
4
  Traverse Flute
61
4
  Clairon
61
2
  Ottava
61
    Tremolo  

     

     
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Gemshorn
61
1 3/5
  Tierce
61
8
  Copula
61
    Fourniture III ranks
183
4
  Praestant 
61
8
  Vox Humana
61
4
  Rohrflöte
61
8
  Cromorne
61
2 2/3
  Nazard
61
4
  Schalmey
61
2
  Doublette
61
    Tremolo  

     

     
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
16
  Principal
32
4
  Choralbass
32
16
  Subbass
32
    Rauschwerk IV ranks
128
10 2/3
  Grossquinte 
32
16
  Posaune
32
8
  Octave
32
8
  Trumpet
32
8
  Flute
32
       
               
Couplers
    Great to Pedal   Swell to Great
    Swell to Pedal   Choir to Great
    Choir to Pedal   Swell to Choir
               
Adjustable Combinations
   
Great Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb)
Swell Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb)
Choir Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb)
Pedal Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (toe)
General Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb & toe)
  Setter Piston
  General Cancel Piston
               
Reversibles
    Great to Pedal (thumb & toe)   Full Organ (toe)
    Swell to Pedal (thumb & toe)   Glockensonne (toe)
    Choir to Pedal (thumb & toe)    
               
Expression
    Balanced Swell Pedal      
    Balanced Choir Pedal      
               
Holtkamp Organ (1989) at All Souls Unitarian Church - New York City (Photo: John Rust)  
Holtkamp Organ (1989) at All Souls Unitarian Church - New York City (Photo: John Rust)
 
Holtkamp Organ (1989) at All Souls Unitarian Church - New York City (Photo: John Rust)
         
Austin Organs, Inc.
Hartford, Conn. (1970s)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals


Sometime in the 1970s Austin Organs, Inc. of Hartford rebuilt and tonally updated the existing 1932 Austin organ. Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
           
Austin Organ Company
Hartford, Conn. – Opus 1707 (1932)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 50 stops, 37 ranks


The original organ in the present All Souls Church was built in 1932 by the Austin Organ Company of Hartford, who installed the pipes in chambers on either side of the rear gallery. Six of the Swell stops were double-enclosed within the Swell expression box, allowing for a quasi-Echo division. Of the 38 combons on the Austin stop-tongue console, those affecting the manuals were on double-touch, with the second touch operating the Pedal stops. Organist Bruno Huhn played the dedicatory recital on Sunday, November 6, 1932.

This organ was rebuilt and tonally revised in the 1970s.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed with Choir
16
  Diapason
61
8
  Gemshorn
61
8
  First Diapason
61
4
  Principal
61
8
  Second Diapason
61
2 2/3
  Twelfth
61
8
  Gross Floete
61
2
  Fifteenth
61
8
  Harmonic Flute
61
8
  Tuba
61

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon
73
2
  Flautino †
61
8
  Diapason
73
1 3/5
  Tierce †
61
8
  Clarabella
73
    Mixture III ranks [draws † stops]
8
  Viole d'Orchestre
73
16
  Oboe [unit]
85
8
  Viole Celeste
73
8
  Cornopean
73
8
  Chimney Flute *
73
8
  Oboe
8
  Flute Celeste [TC] *
61
4
  Oboe
8
  Aeoline *
73
8
  Vox Humana *
61
8
  Voix Celeste [TC] *
61
    Tremulant Vox  
4
  Flauto d'Amore *
73
    Tremulant  
2 2/3
  Nazard †
61
   
* double enclosed

     

     
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Diapason
73
2
  Piccolo
61
8
  Concert Flute
73
8
  Corno d'Amore
73
8
  Quintadena
73
8
  Clarinet
73
8
  Dulciana
73
8
 
Harp [Deagan]
61 bars
8
  Unda Maris [TC]
61
4
  Harp-Celesta
4
  Flauto Traverso
73
    Tremulant  

     

     
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
32
  Bourdon [unit]
56
8
  Diapason
16
  First Diapason [unit]
44
8
  Bourdon
16
  Second Diapason
GT
16
  Tuba [ext. GT]
12
16
  Bourdon
16
  Oboe
SW
16
  Bourdon
SW
8
  Tuba
GT
               
Couplers
    Great to Pedal 8', 4'   Swell to Choir 16', 8', 4'
    Swell to Pedal 8', 4'   Great to Great 16', 4'
    Choir to Pedal 8', 4'   Swell to Swell 16', 4'
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'   Choir to Choir 16', 4'
    Choir to Great 16', 8', 4'    
               
Adjustable Combinations
    "48 Combons" (not listed)
    Manual Combons are on double-touch, second touch operating Pedal stops
    Patented Austin cancel bars for each group of stop-tongues
               
Expression
    Balanced Pedal – Great Organ      
    Balanced Pedal – Choir Organ      
    Balanced Pedal – Swell Organ      
    Balanced Pedal – Swell II Organ      
    Register Crescendo Pedal      
           
 

Ferris & Stuart organ (1856) in Church of the Holy Zebra - New York City

Organ in Church of the Holy Zebra at 249 Fourth Avenue:

Ferris & Stuart
New York City (1856)
Mechanical action
3 manuals, 34 stops, 40 ranks
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 56 notes
16
  Tenoroon (Dbl. Op. Diap.)
56
3
  Twelfth
56
8
  1st Open Diapason
56
2
  Fifteenth
56
8
  2nd Open Diapason
56
  Sesquialtera, 3 ranks
168
8
  Stop Diapason (wood)
56
    Mixture, 2 ranks
112
4
  1st Principal
56
8
  Trumpet
56
4
  2nd Principal
56
4
  Clarion
56

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 56 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon (wood)
56
    Cornet, 3 ranks
168
8
  Open Diapason
56
    Sesquialtera, 2 ranks
112
8
  Dulciana
56
8
  Trumpet
56
8
  Stop Diapason (wood)
56
8
  Hautboy
56
4
  Principal
56
8
  Vox Humana
56

     

     
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 56 notes
8
  Open Diapason
56
4
  Rohr Flute
56
8
  Dulciana
56
4
  Wald Flute (wood)
56
8
  Viol d'Amour *
56
2
  Fifteenth
56
8
  Stop Diapason (wood)
56
8
  Cremona
56
4
  Principal
56
   
* Keraulophon on some sources

     

     
Pedal Organ – 27 notes
16
  Open Diapason (wood)
27
16
  Bourdon (wood)
27
16
  Dulciana (wood)
27
       
               
Couplers
    Pedal and Great       Great and Choir  
    Pedal and Swell       Great and Swell  
    Pedal and Choir       Choir and Swell  
               
Mechanicals
    Pedal Check       Vox Tremulant  
    Bellows       Swell Pedal  
           
Organ in Church of the Divine Unity at 548 Broadway:

E. & G.G. Hook
Boston, Mass. – Opus. 65 (1844)
Mechanical action
3 manuals, 33 stops


Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
         
  Thomas Appleton organ, Op. 17 (1827) - First Congregational Church - New York City
   
 
  Restored Appleton Organ
in Middle Haddam, Conn.
Organ in First Congregational Church on Chambers Street:

Thomas Appleton
Boston, Mass. – Opus 17 (1827)
Mechanical action
2 manuals, 15 stops, 17 ranks






The First Congregational Church had an organ built in 1827 by Thomas Appleton of Boston. This organ is presumed to be Appleton's Opus 17. Appleton provided a case of Mahogany with console materials of Black Walnut. Installed early in 1828, the organ was used until 1844 when the society decided to move uptown. The organ was purchased by the First Congregational Church of Middletown, Conn., where it served until that society completed a larger church building in 1873. The Appleton organ was then sold to the Second Congregational Church of Middle Haddam, Conn. In 1950, the organ was partially dismantled to allow for the installation of a speaker for an electronic organ. In the early 1990s, the organ was restored by Mann & Trupiano in their Brooklyn shop. This organ is extant as of 2011.
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 58 notes [GG – f3 omitting GG#]
8
  Open Diapason
58
3
  Twelfth
58
8
  Stopd Diapason
42
2
  Fifteenth
58
8
  Stopd Diapason Bass
16
  Sesquialtera, 3 ranks [17.19.22]
174
8
  Dulciana
58
8
  Trumpet Treble
42
4
  Principal
58
8
  Trumpet Bass
16
4
  Flute
58
   

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 35 notes, enclosed [TG – f3]
8
  Open Diapason
35
4
  Principal
35
8
  Stopt Diapason
35
4
  Violini
35
8
  Stopt Diapason Bass *
16
8
  Hautboy
35

     

 
* "Choir Bass," unenclosed
Pedal Organ – 25 notes
16
  Sub-bass
25
   
               
Couplers &c
    Great and Swell       Swell pedal (hitchdown)  
    Pedal and Great          
    Pedal and Swell          
           
Sources:
     "All Souls' Church Lays Cornerstone," The New York Times (Feb. 8, 1932).
     "All Souls Church Opens New Home," The New York Times (Nov. 14, 1932).
     "All Souls' Church Swept by Flames," The New York Times (Aug. 24, 1931).
     All Souls Unitarian Church web site: www.allsoulsnyc.org
     The American Organist (Nov. 1932). Specifications of Austin Organ, Op. 1707 (1932). Courtesy Jeff Scofield.
     Dunlap, David. From Abyssinian to Zion: A Guide to Manhattan's Houses of Worship. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004.
     "New-York Church Architecture," Putnam's Monthly (Sept. 1853). New York: G. P. Putnam & Co., 1853.
     Ochse, Orpha. Austin Organs. Richmond: The Organ Historical Society, 2001.
     Ogasapian, John. Organ Building in New York City: 1700-1900. Braintree: The Organ Literature Foundation, 1977.
     Stern, Robert A.M., Gregory Gilmartin, and Thomas Mellins. New York 1930: Architecture and Urbanism Between the Two World Wars. New York City: Rizzoli International Publications, 1987.
     Trupiano, Larry. "An Appleton Renaissance, 1827-1992." Specifications of Thomas Appleton organ (1827). Courtesy Jonathan Bowen.
     Trupiano, Larry. Specifications of Ferris & Stuart organ (1856).

Illustrations:
     Lewis, James. Interior (c.1856) of Church of the Holy Zebra showing Ferris & Stuart organ (1856).
     "New-York Church Architecture," Putnam's Monthly (Vol. II, No. IX), Sept. 1853. Church of the Divine Unity.
     Rust, John. All Souls' Church exterior; interior; Holtkamp organ (1989).
     Peterson, Mark. Photos of Thomas Appleton organ as restored by Mann & Trupiano for Second Congregational Church, Middle Haddam, Conn.