The Juilliard School - New York City

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The Juilliard School

60 Lincoln Center Plaza  
New York, N.Y. 10023
http://www.juilliard.edu







 
Organ Specifications:
60 Lincoln Center Plaza (since 1969) – renamed The Juilliard School (1969)
 IV/85 Th. Kuhn Organ Builders Ltd. (1975) – see Alice Tully Hall
III/57 Holtkamp Organ Company (1969); enl. 2002 – Paul Recital Hall
III/44 Holtkamp Organ Company, Op. 1840 (1969) – Paul Recital Hall
III/12 Schoenstein & Co., Op. 158 (2010) – Studio
II/17 Flentrop Orgelbouw (1969) – Studio
II/7 Holtkamp Organ Company, Op. 1843 (1969) – Practice – sold to Eugenia Sullivan (2009)
II/3 Noack Organ Company (1969) – Practice
132 Claremont Avenue (1910-1969) – renamed The Juilliard School of Music (1926)
III/29 Aeolian-Skinner Organ Co., Op. 1272 (1955) – Recital Hall
• II/4 Holtkamp Organ Company, Op. 1664 (1954) – Practice
• II/ M.P. Möller, Op. 7862 (1949) – Practice
• II/ M.P. Möller, Op. 7859 (1949) – Practice
III/- Casavant Frères, Op. 1860 (1946) – Studio console
IV/53 Casavant Frères, Op. 1440 (1931) – Borden Auditorium
III/24 Hillgreen, Lane & Co., Op. 781 (1924) – Recital Hall
II/5 Hillgreen, Lane & Co., Op. 772 (1924) – Practice
II/7 Estey Organ Company, Op. 819 (1910) – Practice
II/7 Estey Organ Company, Op. 818 (1910) – Practice
II/17 Estey Organ Company, Op. 806 (1910) – Recital Hall
53 Fifth Avenue at 12th Street (1894-1910) – known as the Institute of Musical Art
II/11 Aeolian Company, Op. 998 (1905) – Recital Hall


At the time The Juilliard School was founded in 1905 (as the Institute of Musical Art), the idea of establishing a music academy in America to rival the European conservatories was a novel one. But Dr. Frank Damrosch, the godson of Franz Liszt and the head of music education for New York City's public schools, was convinced that American musicians should not have to go abroad for their training. Damrosch and his financial backer, James Loeb (who contributed $500,000 in memory of his mother), modestly planned for 100 students, but found that they had greatly underestimated the demand for high-quality musical training. The Institute quickly outgrew its original home at Fifth Avenue and 12th Street, and, in 1910, moved to new quarters on Claremont Avenue at 122nd Street in Morningside Heights.

Institute of Musical Art (132 Claremont Avenue) - New York City (Library of Congress)  
Institute of Musical Art (1910)
132 Claremont Avenue
 
The Juilliard Graduate School Building at left of Institute (1950)  
The Juilliard Graduate School Building shown at left of Institute (1950)  
When Mr. Augustus D. Juilliard, a wealthy textile merchant, died in 1919, his Will contained the largest single bequest for the advancement of music at that time. In 1924, the trustees of that bequest founded the Juilliard Graduate School to help worthy music students complete their education. In 1926, the Graduate School and the Institute of Musical Art merged as the Juilliard School of Music under one president, the distinguished Columbia University professor John Erskine, but with separate deans and identities. Damrosch continued as the Institute's dean, and Ernest Hutcheson was appointed dean of the Graduate School. In 1937, Hutcheson succeeded Erskine as president of the combined institutions. (Juilliard's Evening Division — originally the Extension Division — was begun in 1933, offering continuing education for adults.) Composer William Schuman, later to win the first Pulitzer Prize for music, became president of the combined schools in 1945. Under his administration, the merger process of the schools was completed. Schuman established the Dance Division in 1951 with Martha Hill as its first director. He also established the Juilliard String Quartet in 1946, the School's teaching and performance quartet-in-residence. And in 1947 he created an innovative music theory curriculum, called Literature and Materials of Music (known as L&M), that changed the manner in which music was taught throughout the United States. He resigned in 1961 to become president of the newly constructed Lincoln Center.

Dr. Peter Mennin, another well-known composer, was Schuman's successor. In 1968 Mennin created a Drama Division—with John Houseman as its first director and Michel Saint-Denis as consultant—and oversaw the move of Juilliard to Lincoln Center in 1969. The School changed its name to The Juilliard School to reflect its broader artistic scope. With the move also came the creation of the current Pre-College Division, offering intensive musical instruction to talented youngsters from 8 to 18. (Music lessons for young students had been provided through Juilliard's Preparatory Division since 1916.)

After Mennin's death in 1983, Dr. Joseph W. Polisi became the School's sixth and current president, beginning with the 1984-85 academic year. Dr. Polisi's term at Juilliard has been a time of vitality for the School, with the establishment of new student services, alumni programs, a revised curriculum, a new emphasis on the humanities and liberal arts, and the realization of two major goals: the completion of its first residence hall—the Meredith Willson Residence Hall—which opened in 1990, and the establishment of a jazz program—the Institute for Jazz Studies (a collaboration of The Juilliard School and Jazz at Lincoln Center)—which began in September 2001.
           
 

Holtkamp Organ (2002) in Paul Hall, Juilliard School - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)

Organ in Paul Recital Hall at Lincoln Center Plaza:

Holtkamp Organ Company
Cleveland, Ohio – Opus 1840 (1969, enlarged 2002)
Electro-pneumatic key and stop action
Solid-state combination action
3 manuals, 52 stops, 57 ranks





Paul Hall, a 277-seat recital venue in the Juilliard building, is named for Col. C. Michael Paul, a Wall Street financier and philanthropist (and an amateur violinist and conductor) who gave $1 million so that Juilliard students would have a glamorous place to demonstrate their talents. Designed by Pietro Belluschi, the cherry-paneled hall is wider in relation to its length, and had red leather seats on a raked floor. Heinrich Keilholz was responsible for the acoustic design for both Paul Hall and nearby Alice Tully Hall. Paul Hall was dedicated on November 30, 1970.

The organ in Paul Hall was originally built in 1969 by the Holtkamp Organ Company, to specifications drawn up by Vernon de Tar (1905-1999), Chair of the Organ Department, in collaboration with Walter "Chick" Holtkamp, Jr. In 2002, the organ was enlarged by Holtkamp, who added an enclosed Solo division and a new three-manual drawknob console, as designed by John Weaver, chair, and Gerre Hancock, faculty, of the Organ Department. Following is the 2002 specification.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
16
  Bourdon *
61
2
  Superoctave
61
8
  Principal
61
    Mixture IV ranks
244
8
  Harmonic Flute *
61
8
  Trumpet
61
8
  Gedackt
61
    Tremolo *  
4
  Octave
61
    Great Unison Off *  
4
  Spitzflute
61
       

     

     
Positive Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes
16
  Quintadena [unit, orig. GT]
73
2
  Doublette
61
8
  Montre *
61
1 3/5
  Tierce
61
8
  Copula
61
  Scharf III ranks
183
8
  Quintadena
8
  Cromorne
61
4
  Gemshorn *
61
    Tremolo *  
4
  Rohrflute
61
    Positive 16' *  
2 2/3
  Nazard
61
    Positive Unison Off *  

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Geigen Principal *
61
16
  Dulzian
61
8
  Gamba
61
8
  Trompette *
61
8
  Voix Celeste [TF]
56
8
  Fagott
61
8
  Bourdon
61
4
  Clairon *
61
4
  Principal
61
    Tremolo *  
4
  Traverse Flute *
61
    Swell 16' *  
2
  Spillflute
61
    Swell Unison Off *  
1 1/3
  Larigot
61
    Swell 4' *  
    Fourniture III ranks
183
       

     

     
Solo Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Concert Flute *
61
8
  Vox Humana *
61
8
  Viola Pomposa *
61
    Tremolo *  
8
  Viola Celeste {TC] *
49
    Solo 16' *  
4
  Nachthorn *
61
    Solo Unison Off *  
8
  Cornopean *
61
    Solo 4' *  
8
  Clarinet *
61
       
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
32
  Untersatz [ext., 1-12 digital] *
8
  Gedackt
32
16
  Principal
32
4
  Choralbass
32
16
  Subbass
32
    Mixture III ranks
96
16
  Bourdon
GT
16
  Posaune
32
16
  Quintaten
POS
8
  Trumpet
32
8
  Octave
32
4
  Schalmey
32
               
           
* new in 2002
Couplers
    Great to Pedal 8'   Solo to Great 16', 8', 4'
    Swell to Pedal 8', 4'   Pedal to Great
    Positive to Pedal 8', 4'   Swell to Positive 16', 8', 4'
    Solo to Pedal 8'   Great to Positive 8'
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'   Solo to Swell 8'
    Positive to Great 16', 8'    
             
Adjustable Combinations
   
General Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10 (thumb & toe)
Swell Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb)
Great Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb)
Positive Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb)
Solo Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb)
Pedal Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (toe)
  General Cancel (thumb)
  Capture (thumb)
             
Reversibles
    Great to Pedal (thumb & toe)   Solo to Pedal (thumb & toe)
    Swell to Pedal (thumb & toe)   Full Organ (thumb & toe)
    Positive to Pedal (thumb & toe)    
             
Pedal Movements
    Balanced Swell Pedal    
    Balanced Solo Pedal    
    Crescendo Pedal    
             
Accessories
    Manual natural keys – Ivory   Adjustable Bench
    Manual sharp keys – Ebony   Inlaid wood music rack
    Pedal natural keys – Maple   Music rack light
    Pedal sharp keys – Rosewood   Pedalboard light
    Drawknobs of Cocobola with Ivory facings   Full Organ indicator light

     

   
Holtkamp Organ (2002) in Paul Hall, Juilliard School - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)   Holtkamp Organ (2002) in Paul Hall, Juilliard School - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
         
 

Holtkamp Organ (1969) in Paul Hall, Juilliard School - New York City (photo: Holtkamp Organ Company)

Organ in Paul Recital Hall at Lincoln Center Plaza:

Holtkamp Organ Company
Cleveland, Ohio – Opus 1840 (1969)
Electro-pneumatic key and stop action
3 manuals, 36 stops, 44 ranks








The organ in Paul Recital Hall was built in 1969 by the Holtkamp Organ Company of Cleveland. Vernon de Tar, Chair of the Organ Department, designed the instrument in collaboration with Walter "Chick" Holtkamp, Jr. Following is the Holtkamp Factory Specification of December 12, 1966.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
16
  Quintadena
61
4
  Spitzflöte
61
8
  Principal
61
2
  Super Octave
61
8
  Gedackt
61
    Mixture IV ranks
244
4
  Octave
61
8
  Trumpet
61

     

     
Positiv Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes
8
  Copula
61
2
  Principal
61
8
  Gemshorn
61
1 3/5
  Tierce
61
4
  Rohrflöte
61
    Scharf III ranks
183
2 2/3
  Nazard
61
8
  Cromorne
61

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Gamba
61
1 1/3
  Larigot
61
8
  Bourdon
61
    Fourniture III ranks
183
8
  Celeste [TF]
56
16
  Dulzian
61
4
  Principal
61
8
  Fagott
61
4
  Spillflöte
61
4
  Clarion
61

     

     
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
16
  Principal
32
4
  Choralbass
32
16
  Quintadena
GT
    Mixture III ranks
96
16
  Subbass
32
16
  Posaune
32
8
  Octave
32
8
  Trumpet
32
8
  Gedackt
32
4
  Schalmey
32
               
Couplers (Reversible is by piston and toe stud)
    Great to Pedal (Reversible)   Swell to Great
    Swell to Pedal   Positiv to Great
    Positiv to Pedal   Swell to Positiv
               
Adjustable Combinations
   
General Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb & toe)
Swell Pistons 1-2-3-4 (thumb)
Great Pistons 1-2-3-4 (thumb)
Positiv Pistons 1-2-3-4 (thumb)
Pedal Pistons 1-2-3-4 (toe)
  General Cancel (thumb)
  Capture (thumb)
               
Pedal Movements
    Balanced Swell Pedal
    Crescendo Pedal with indicator light
    Full Organ Reversible toe stud with indicator light
         
  Schoenstein Organ, Op. 158 (2010) at The Juilliard School - New York City  (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
Studio Organ at Lincoln Center Plaza:

Schoenstein & Co.
Benicia, Calif. – Opus 158 (2010)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 33 stops, 12 voices, 12 ranks



Schoenstein Organ, Op. 158 (2010) at The Juilliard School - New York City  (photo: Steven E. Lawson)  
In 2010, Schoenstein & Co. installed their Op. 158, a three-manual and pedal organ that has 33 stops controlling 12 ranks. The organ has an American style drawknob console with adjustable bench and music rack, all of white oak and polished walnut.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, unenclosed
16
  Bourdon [TC]
CH
4
  Lieblich Gedeckt
CH
8
  Open Diapason
61
2
  Fifteenth
61
8
  Claribel Flute
SW
8
  Flügel Horn
SW
8
  Fernflöte
61
8
  Clarinet [TC]
CH
8
  Salicional
CH
    Great Unison Off  
4
  Principal
61
    Great 4'  

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Claribel Flute
61
8
  Flügel Horn
8
  Echo Gamba
61
    Tremulant  
8
  Vox Celeste [TC]
49
    Swell 16'  
4
  Gemshorn
61
    Swell Unison Off  
16
  Bass Horn [unit]
73
    Swell 4'  
               
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Salicional [TC] *
8
  Clarinet [TC]
49
8
  Lieblich Gedeckt [unit]
73
    Tremulant **  
8
  Salicional [unit]
85
    Choir 16'  
4
  Lieblich Gedeckt
    Choir Unison Off  
4
  Salicet
    Choir 4'  
2 2/3
  Nazard [Lieb. Ged.]
* prepared for later addition of 12 pipes
2
  Fifteenth [Salic.]
   
** affects Great and Choir stops
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
16
  Bourdon [ext. CH]
12
4
  Fifteenth [Op. Diap.]
GT
16
 
Salicional
preparation
4
  Claribel Flute
SW
8
  Claribel Flute
SW
16
  Bass Horn
SW
8
  Lieblich Gedeckt
CH
8
  Flügel Horn
SW
8
  Salicional
CH
4
  Clarinet
CH
               
Couplers
    Great to Pedal 8', 4'   Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'
    Swell to Pedal 8', 4'   Choir to Great 16', 8', 4'
    Choir to Pedal 8', 4'   Swell to Choir 16', 8', 4'
               
Adjustable Combinations (256 memories and lock; programmable piston range for each memory)
   
General Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10 (8 left; 2 right; thumb & toe)
Swell Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb)
Great Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb)
Choir Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb)
Pedal Pistons 1-2-3 (toe)
  General Cancel (thumb)
  Set (thumb)
               
Reversibles
    Swell to Great reversible piston
    Great to Pedal reversible piston and toe stud
    Swell to Pedal reversible piston and toe stud
    Full organ reversible piston and toe lever with adjustable memories and indicator
               
Mechanicals
    Balanced brass Swell expression pedal      
    Balanced brass Choir expression pedal      
    Transposer      
    Record/Playback system      
           
 

Flentrop organ (1969) in Organ Studio at The Juilliard School - New York City  (2010 photo: Steven E. Lawson)

  2009 Organ Studio
Studio Organ at Lincoln Center Plaza:

Flentrop Orgelbouw B.V.
Zaandam, The Netherlands (1969)
Mechanical key and stop action
2 manuals, 14 stops, 17 ranks



Flentrop organ (1969) in Organ Studio at The Juilliard School - New York City  (1969 photo: Ezra Stoller (ESTO); courtesy Juilliard School Archives)  
Original Organ Studio  
   
   
The two-manual mechanical action organ in the large organ studio on the fifth floor of the Juilliard building was built in 1969 by Flentrop Orgelbouw of The Netherlands. Faculty member Vernon de Tar gave an inaugural recital to dedicate the organ on November 10, 1969. Mr. de Tar performed works by Frescobaldi, Schlick, Scheidt, Mozart, Jehan Alain, J.S. Bach, and Handel, with assistance by violinists Sylvia Davis and Muriel Moebius, violist Osher Green, cellist Donald Larson, double bassist Ronald Bozicevich, and oboists Marc Schachman and Steven Taylor. Dirk Flentrop of Flentrop Orgelbouw of Zaandam, Holland, was present for the dedication.

In 2009, the studio was reconfigured to be slightly smaller and the Flentrop organ was reconditioned.
               
Hoofdwerk (Manuaal I) – 56 notes
8
  Roerfluit
56
  Mixtuur III ranks
168
4
  Prestant
56
8
  Kromhoorn
56
2
  Gemshoorn
56
       

     

     
Borstwerk (Manuaal II) – 56 notes
8
  Gedekt
56
1 1/3
  Quint
56
4
  Koppelfluit
56
  Sesquialter II ranks
112
2
  Prestant
56
     
               
Pedaal – 32 notes
16
  Subbas
32
4
  Roerfluit
32
8
  Gedekt
32
16
  Fagot
32
               
Koppelingen
    I + P          
    II + P          
    II + I          
           
Practice Organ at Lincoln Center Plaza:

The Holtkamp Organ Company
Cleveland, Ohio – Opus 1843 (1969)
Electro-pneumatic key and stop action
2 manuals, 16 stops, 7 ranks


For the new Lincoln Center building, a two-manual practice organ was built by the Holtkamp Organ Company. This unenclosed and unified organ was shipped with the larger organ built for Paul Recital Hall. Following is the Factory Specification of December 12, 1966. This organ was sold to Eugenia Sullivan, a Juilliard alum, and removed in 2009.
               
Manual I – 61 notes
8
  Gedackt  
  Mixture III ranks  
4
  Principal  
8
  Cromorne  
4
  Quintadena          

     

     
Manual II – 61 notes
8
  Quintadena  
2
  Flute  
4
  Gedackt  
4
  Cromorne  
2
  Principal  
     
               
Pedal – 32 notes
16
  Quintadena  
4
  Quintadena  
8
  Gedackt  
8
  Cromorne  
4
  Principal  
4
  Cromorne  
               
Stop Analysis
     
Pipes
16
  Quintadena
85
8
  Gedackt
85
4
  Principal
73
  Mixture III ranks
183
8
  Cromorne
    73
   
Total
499
           
Practice Organ at Lincoln Center Plaza:

The Noack Organ Company, Inc.
Georgetown, Mass. (1969)
Mechanical key and stop action
2 manuals, 3 stops, 3 ranks
 
  Noack Organ (1969) at The Juilliard School - New York City  (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
   
   
Manual I – 56 notes
 
8
  Gedackt
56
 

     

 
Manual II – 56 notes
 
8
  Gedackt
MAN I
   
           
Pedal – 30 notes
 
8
  Std. Bass
30
   
4
  Flute
30
   
           
 

Aeolian-Skinner Organ, Op. 1272 (1955) in The Juilliard School - New York City

Concert Organ in Recital Hall at 132 Claremont Avenue:

Aeolian-Skinner Organ Company
Boston, Mass. – Opus 1272 (1955)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 29 stops, 29 ranks, 1,699 pipes






In 1955, the Aeolian-Skinner Organ Company installed their Opus 1272, a three-manual instrument installed in a niche above and behind the stage of the Recital Hall of the Juilliard School of Music. Vernon de Tar, Chair of the Organ Department, designed the organ and also dedicated it on January 10, 1956. The organ remained at the Claremont Avenue building when the Juilliard School relocated to Lincoln Center in 1969; the building's new occupants, the Manhattan School of Music, continued to use the organ. A leaky roof damaged the organ in 1969 and again in 1982, after which a substantial amount of pipework was replaced by Anthony Bufano. Tonal revisions by Bufano took place after another leak in 1988. The organ was removed in 2002 when Hubbard Hall was renovated and renamed Greenfield Hall. Following are the specifications from the Aeolian-Skinner Factory Contract.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes (3" pressure)
16
  Quintaton
61
2
  Fifteenth
61
8
  Spitzprinzipal
61
    Plein Jeu III-V ranks
207
8
  Bourdon
61
    Great to Great 4'  
4
  Principal
61
       

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed (3¼" pressure)
8
  Rohrflöte
61
8
  Trompette
61
8
  Viole de Gambe
61
4
  Hautbois
61
8
  Viole Celeste
61
    Tremulant  
4
  Gemshorn
61
    Swell to Swell 16'  
2 2/3
  Nasat
61
    Swell Unison  
2
  Blockflöte       Swell to Swell 4'  
1 3/5
  Terz          

     

     
Positif Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes (2½" pressure)
8
  Nason Flute
61
    Zimbel III ranks
183
4
  Koppelflöte
61
8
  Krummhorn
61
2
  Italian Principal
61

  Tremulant  
1 1/3
  Larigot
61

     
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes (3" pressure)
16
  Montre [unit]
56
4
  Choral Bass
16
  Quintaten
32
16
  Fagot [unit, 1-12 L/2]
32
8
  Principal
8
  Fagot
8
  Rohrflöte
SW
4
  Fagot
               
Couplers
    Great to Pedal   Swell to Great 8', 4'
    Swell to Pedal 8', 4'   Positiv to Great 16', 8'
    Positiv to Pedal 8', 4'   Swell to Positiv 8', 4'
               
Adjustable Combinations
("Adjustable by recording board, visibly moving the tilting tablet stop controls")
   
Swell Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4 (thumb)
Great Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4 (thumb)
Positiv Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4 (thumb)
Pedal Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4 (thumb & toe)
General Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8 (thumb & toe)
  General Cancel (thumb)
               
Mechanicals
    Swell to Pedal Reversible   Swell Expression Pedal
    Great to Pedal Reversible   Crescendo Pedal
    Positiv to Pedal Reversible    
           
Practice Organ at 132 Claremont Avenue:

The Holtkamp Organ Company
Cleveland, Ohio – Opus 1664 (1952)
Electro-pneumatic key and stop action
2 manuals, 4 ranks


Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
           
Practice Organ at 132 Claremont Avenue:

M.P. Möller, Inc.
Hagerstown, Md. – Opus 7862 (1949)
Electro-pneumatic action
2 manuals


Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
           
Practice Organ at 132 Claremont Avenue:

M.P. Möller, Inc. 
Hagerstown, Md. – Opus 7859 (1949)
Electro-pneumatic action
2 manuals


Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
           
Studio Organ at 132 Claremont Avenue:

Casavant Frères, Limitée
St. Hyacinthe, Québec, Canada – Opus 1860 (1946)
3 manual console, 30 stops


In 1946, Casavant Frères supplied a three-manual console which was installed by Wilfrid Lavallée, the Casavant representative from 1924-1956. This console may have controlled an organ assembled by Mr. Lavallée for a teaching studio.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
8
  Open Diapason  
4
  Dulcet  
8
  Melodia  
2 2/3
  Twelfth  
8
  Dulciana  
2
  Fifteenth  
4
  Octave       Mixture III ranks  
4
  Flute Harmonic          

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Stopped Flute  
2
  Piccolo  
8
  Salicional  
1 3/5
  Tierce  
8
  Voix Celeste  
8
  Oboe  
4
  Principal       Tremulant  
4
  Flute       Swell Sub  
2 2/3
  Nazard       Swell Super  
               
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Geigen Principal  
4
  Gemshorn  
8
  Melodia  
2
  Flageolet  
8
  Dulciana       Choir Sub  
4
  Principal       Choir Super  
4
  Flute Harmonic          
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
16
  Bourdon  
8
  Stopped Flute  
8
  Octave  
4
  Flute  
8
  Cello          
               
Couplers in Tablets
    Great to Pedal 8'   Choir to Great 16', 8', 4'
    Swell to Pedal 8', 4'   [Swell to Choir 16', 8', 4'] *
    Choir to Pedal 8'   Full Organ [extreme right]
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'  
* not listed
               
Adjustable Combination Pistons
    Pistons 1-2-3-4 to Great Organ
    Pistons 1-2-3-4 to Swell Organ and two couplers
    Pistons 1-2-3-4 to Choir Organ and two couplers
    Pistons 1-2-3-4 Generals (toe)
    General Release          
    Adjuster          
               
Reversible Pistons
    Full Organ (toe) duplicated by thumb   Swell to Pedal
    Great to Pedal (toe) duplicated by thumb   Choir to Pedal
               
Balanced Pedals
    Swell (6 contacts) over the space between E and F
    Choir (6 contacts) to the left of Swell
    Crescendo (on all stops and couplers) to the right of Swell
               
Indicators
    Wind       Full Organ  
    Crescendo          
           
  Casavant Frères Organ, Op. 1440 (1931) in Borden Auditorium of The Juilliard School - New York City (photo: Impact Photos, Inc.; courtesy Juilliard School Archives)
Organ in Borden Auditorium at 132 Claremont Avenue:

Casavant Frères, Limitée
St. Hyacinthe, Québec, Canada – Opus 1440 (1931)
Electro-pneumatic action
4 manuals, 58 stops, 53 ranks








The Casavant Frères organ in Borden Auditorium of the Juilliard School was installed in chambers above the ceiling, speaking through grills into the stagehouse and auditorium. The four-manual oak console with polished mahogany interior was "detached and located at about 40 feet from [the] organ" loft overhead. When the school decided to discard the organ, several ranks were incorporated into various area organs, including the Aeolian-Skinner, Op. 945 (1936) at Calvary Episcopal Church.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
16
  Double Open Diapason
73
4
  Octave
73
8
  Open Diapason
73
4
  Harmonic Flute
73
8
  Open Diapason
73
2 2/3
  Twelfth
73
8
  Clarabella
73
2
  Fifteenth
61
8
  Gemshorn
73
8
  Trumpet
73
 
     
 
     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed

16
  Lieblich Gedeckt
73
1 3/5
  Tierce
61
8
  Open Diapason
73
  Mixture III ranks
219
8
  Stopped Flute
73
16
  Double Trumpet
73
8
  Salicional
73
8
  Cornopean
73
8
  Voix Céleste
73
8
  Oboe
73
8
  Aeoline
73
8
  Vox Humana
73
4
  Octave
73
4
  Clarion
73
4
  Flûte Triangulaire
73
    Tremulant  
2
  Piccolo
61
 
     
 
     
 
     
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed

16
  Echo Gamba
73
2
  Flageolet
61
8
  Violin Diapason
73
1 3/5
  Tierce
61
8
  Concert Flute
73
8
  Clarinet
73
8
  Dolce
73
 
Celesta
61 bars
8
  Unda Maris
73
  Harp (Celesta Sub)
4
  Flûte Traverse
73
    Tremulant  
2 2/3
  Nazard
73
       
               
Solo Organ (Manual IV) – 61 notes, enclosed

8
  Diapason
73
16
  Posaune
73
8
  Gross Flute
73
8
  Tuba
73
8
  Gamba
73
8
  French Horn
73
8
  Gamba Céleste
73
4
  Octave Tuba
73
4
  Orchestral Flute
73
    Tremulant  
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes

32
  Contra Bourdon [unit]
56
8
  Flute
16
  Open Diapason
32
8
  Violoncello
32
16
  Open Diapason
GT
4
  Super Octave
16
  Violone
32
32
  Contra Trombone [unit]
56
16
  Bourdon
16
  Trombone
16
  Gedeckt
SW
8
  Trumpet
8
  Octave [unit]
44
     
               
Couplers

    Great to Pedal 8', 4'   Solo to Swell 16', 8', 4'
    Swell to Pedal 8', 4'   Solo to Choir 16', 8', 4'
    Choir to Pedal 8', 4'   Great Sub, Super
    Solo to Pedal 8', 4'   Swell Sub, Super
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'   Choir Sub, Super
    Swell to Choir 16', 8', 4'   Solo Sub, Super
    Choir to Great 16', 8', 4'   Great to Solo
    Solo to Great 16', 8', 4'   All Swells to Swell
               
Adjustable Combination Pistons

   
All Stops & Couplers Pistons 1-2-3-4 (thumb & foot)
Solo Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb)
Swell Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb)
Great Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb)
Choir Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb)
Pedal Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb)
               
Reversible Pistons

    Great to Pedal     Swell to Great
    Great to Pedal (foot)     Choir to Great
    Swell to Pedal     Solo to Great
    Choir to Pedal     Swell to Choir
    Solo to Pedal     Full Organ (foot)
               
Balanced Pedals

    Swell Pedal to Swell   Swell Pedal to Solo
    Swell Pedal to Choir   Crescendo on all stops and couplers
               
Indicators

    Crescendo       Full Organ  
    Wind       Voltmeter  
           
 

Hillgreen, Lane & Co. Organ, Op. 781 (1924) in the Recital Hall of the Institute of Musical Art - New York City

   
Concert Organ in Recital Hall at 132 Claremont Avenue:

Hillgreen, Lane & Company
Alliance, Ohio – Opus 781 (1924)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 32 stops, 24 ranks




In 1924, Hillgreen, Lane & Company rebuilt and enlarged the II/17 Estey Organ, Op. 806 (1910) in the Recital Hall. Several ranks of Estey pipes were reused in the new scheme, resulting in a three-manual organ with twenty-four ranks. Gustav F. Döhring, the Eastern Representative for Hillgreen, Lane & Co., wrote to the home office on June 30, 1924, to specify the details of the reworked organ. Döhring also directed the shop to "bush pedal keys, draw knob stops, combination pneumatics and everything which might make a noise, very well, as this organ and action will be very much in the lime light, and will be used 8 or more hours a day." The existing organ case, designed by Donn Barber, was retained.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed with Choir Organ
8
  Major Diapason *
61
8
  Dulciana *
61
8
  Minor Diapason
61
4
  Minor Flute *
61
8
  Major Flute *
61
8
  Tuba
61
8
  Viola da Gamba
61
       
 
     
 
     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed

8
  Diapason *
73
8
  Melodia
73
8
  Salicional [1-24 old]
73
4
  Flauto Traverso *
73
8
  Vox Celeste
73
8
  Cornopean
73
8
  Aeoline
73
8
  Oboe *
73
8
  Stopped Flute *
73
       
               
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed with Great Organ
16
  Contra Viole * [unit]
85
8
  Saxophone *
61
8
  Violin Diapason
61
4
  Harmonic Flute
8
  Concert Flute [unit]
85
4
  Violetta
8
  Viole *
2
  Flautino
8
  Unda Maris * [TC]
49
       
 
     
 
     
Pedal Organ – 32 notes, enclosed

32
  Contra Diapason [resultant]
8
  Violoncello
CH
16
  Diapason * [unit]
44
8
  Flute [from Diap.]
16
  Violone *
32
8
  Tromba
SW
16
  Bourdon *
32
       
               
Couplers (tilting tablets)

    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'     Swell to Choir 16', 8', 4'
    Choir to Great 16', 8', 4'     Choir to Choir 16', 4', Unison Sep.
    Great to Great 4', Unison Sep.     Great to Pedal 8', 4'
    Swell to Swell 16', 4', Unison Sep.     Swell to Pedal 8', 4'
    Great to Swell 8'     Choir to Pedal 8', 4'
               
Combinations (Adjustable at the console and visibly moving registers)

    4 pistons affecting Great and Pedal
    4 pistons affecting Swell and Pedal
    4 pistons affecting Choir and Pedal
    4 pistons affecting all stops and couplers
    4 toe pistons to operate general combinations
             
Accessories

    Tremolo to Great *    
    Tremolo to Swell *    
    Tremolo to Choir    
       
* reused from Estey Organ, Op. 806 (1910)
               
Pedal Movements

    Great to Pedal Reversible
    Swell and Pedal Expression
    Great, Choir & Pedal Expression
    Crescendo & Full Organ
    Sforzando
           
Practice Organ at 132 Claremont Avenue:

Hillgreen, Lane & Company
Alliance, Ohio – Opus 772 (1924)
Electro-pneumatic action
2 manuals, 14 stops, 5 ranks, 401 pipes



In a letter dated June 12, 1924, Frank Damrosch, Director of the Institute of Musical Art, accepted the proposal by Hillgreen, Lane & Company to reconstruct and enlarge the 1910 Estey Organ (Op. 806) in the Recital Hall, to construct a new practice organ, and to remove the old (Estey) practice organs to the new building. Hillgreen, Lane provided a single Spencer Steel Orgoblo to provide wind for this and the two Estey practice organs.
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Diapason
73
4
  Minor Flute
8
  Major Flute [unit, harmonic]
85
2
  Piccolo
8
  Viole
73
       
 
     
 
     
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed

8
  Violin
GT
8
  Concert Flute
GT
8
  Viole d'Orchestre [unit]
85
4
  Violetta
8
  Stopped Diapason
73
4
  Harmonic Flute
GT
 
     
 
     
Pedal Organ – 32 notes

16
  Sub Bass [ext. 8' Major Fl.]
12
8
  Violoncello
GT
8
  Flute
GT
       
               
Couplers

    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'     Great to Pedal 8', 4'
    Great to Great 4', Unison Release     Swell to Pedal 8', 4'
    Swell to Swell 4', Unison Release      
               
Combinations (Adjustable at keyboard, visibly moving tablets)

    Three pistons affecting Great Organ      
    Three pistons affecting Swell Organ      
               
Accessories

    Tremolo          
               
Pedal Movements

    Great to Pedal Reversible      
    Swell Expression      
    Crescendo and Full Organ      
           
Practice Organ at 132 Claremont Avenue:

Estey Organ Company
Brattleboro, Vt. – Opus 819 (1910)
Electro-pneumatic action
2 manuals, 7 stops, 7 ranks



For the new Institute of Musical Art building on Claremont Avenue, the Estey Organ Company installed two identical studio organs in 1910: Op. 818 and 819. The two organs had celluloid keys, an "A.G.O." pedalboard with 32 notes, and an adjustable bench. Front pipes were decorated in gold bronze and lacquered.
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Open Diapason
61
4
  Octave
61
8
  Dulciana
61
       
 
     
 
     
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed

8
  Salicional
61
4
  Flute Harmonic
61
8
  Stopped Diapason
61
       
 
     
 
     
Pedal Organ – 32 notes

16
  Bourdon
32
       
               
Couplers

    Swell to Great 8', 4'     Great to Pedal 8'
    Swell to Swell 4'     Swell to Pedal 8', 4'
               
Accessories

    Balanced Swell Pedal [not indicated on Shop Order]
           
Practice Organ at 132 Claremont Avenue:

Estey Organ Company
Brattleboro, Vt. – Opus 818 (1910)
Electro-pneumatic action
2 manuals, 7 stops, 7 ranks


Same as Estey, Op. 819 above.
           
  Estey Organ, Op. 806 (1910) in Auditorium of the Institute of Musical Art - New York City (The New York Architect, Sept. 1910; couresy Juilliard School Archives)
Organ in Recital Hall at 132 Claremont Avenue:

Estey Organ Company
Brattleboro, Vt. – Opus 806 (1910)
Electro-pneumatic action
2 manuals, 20 stops, 17 ranks



The organ in the auditorium (Recital Hall) of the new Institute of Musical Art building on Clarement Avenue was built in 1910 by the Estey Organ Company, and installed behind a case designed by architect Donn Barber of New York City. Estey's Shop Order (Sept. 10, 1910) shows that the detached two-manual console would have "Special draw stops," tilting tablets for the couplers, celluloid manual keys, and a roll-top cover. The "A.G.O." pedalboard had 30 notes, and the front pipes were decorated in bronze. A note below the Great 8' Saxaphone [sic] states that this stop is "to be exchanged for any stop of similar scale and pitch, if its tonal effect is not satisfactory." Rollin Smith, in The Aeolian Pipe Organ and Its Music, writes that the earlier Aeolian (Roosevelt) organ was taken in trade by the Estey Organ Company.
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Open Diapason
61
4
  Harmonic Flute
61
8
  Gross Flute
61
2
  Harmonic Piccolo
61
8
  Concert Flute
61
8
  Saxaphone ["reedless"]
61
8
  Dolce
61
       
 
     
 
     
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed

16
  Dulciana
73
8
  Voix Celeste
73
8
  Horn Diapason
73
8
  Echo Muted Viol
73
8
  Stopped Diapason
73
4
  Flauto Traverso
73
8
  Salicional
73
8
  Oboe ["reeds"]
73
 
     
 
     
Pedal Organ – 30 notes

16
  Open Diapason [unit]
42
8
  Octave [Open Diap.]
16
  Bourdon [unit]
42
8
  Flauto Dolce [Bourdon]
16
  Dulciana
SW
       
               
Couplers (tilting tablets)

    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'     Great to Pedal 8', 4'
    Great to Great 16', 4', Release     Swell to Pedal 8', 4'
    Swell to Swell 16', 4', Release        
               
Pedal Movements

    Balanced Swell Pedal     Full Organ Pedal
    Balanced Great Pedal     Great to Pedal Reversible
    Crescendo Pedal        
               
Combinations (Adjustable and Invisible)

    Great and Pedals: 1,2,3,4,"0" and "00"
    Swell and Pedals: 1,2,3,4,"0" and "00"
    Combination Indicator          
           
Concert Organ in Recital Hall of the Institute of Musical Art at 53 Fifth Avenue:

Aeolian Company
New York City – Opus 998 (1905)
Electro-pneumatic action
2 manuals, 11 stops, 11 ranks


This organ was originally built by Frank Roosevelt as Op. 446 in 1889 for Trinity Presbyterian Church, Montclair, New Jersey. A contract dated September 14, 1905, and signed by Frank Damrosch, called for the Aeolian Company to move the organ to the new Institute of Musical Art, housed in the former Lenox Mansion at 53 Fifth Avenue. The contract stipulated that the organ was to be delivered, set up, and ready for use before October 22, 1905! Aeolian provided a new console that had 61-note manual and 30-note pedal compasses (an extension of Roosevelt's 58-note manual and 27-note pedal compasses), and also installed a new Great Trumpet, Swell Oboe, and bellows.

The organ was installed in the 300-seat Recital Hall, originally the large Gothic Hall that had housed the extensive library of James Lenox. Gaston Dethier was the organ instructor at the Institute of Musical Art.
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes
8
  Open Diapason
61
4
  Gemshorn
61
8
  Salicional
61
8
  Trumpet
61
8
  Doppel Flöte
61
       
               
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Violin Diapason
61
4
  Flute Harmonique
61
8
  Dolce
61
8
  Oboe
61
8
  Stopped Diapason
61
       
               
Pedal Organ – 30 notes
16
  Bourdon
30
       
               
Couplers
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'     Great to Pedal
    Swell to Swell 16', 4'     Swell to Pedal 8', 4'
               
Accessories
    Crescendo Pedal    
    Great Organ Swell Pedal    
    Swell Organ Swell Pedal    
    Swell Organ Tremolo    
               
Combination Pistons
    Great: Pianissimo, Piano, Mezzo, Forte, Release
    Swell: Pianissimo, Piano, Mezzo, Forte, Release
           
Sources:
     Aeolian-Skinner Archives web site: http://aeolian-skinner.110mb.com/
     Bethards, Jack. Factory Specifications of Schoenstein & Co. Organ, Op. 158 (2010).
     Bright Outlook For the New Institute of Musical Art," The New York Times (Oct. 8, 1905).
     Callahan, Charles. Aeolian-Skinner Remembered: A History in Letters. Minneapolis: Randall M. Egan, 1996.
     Cochran, Nicole. Specifications of Noack Organ (1969).
     Dahmus, Jeni. "Time Capsule," The Juilliard Journal Online (Vol. XXIV, No. 3, Nov. 2008).
     Flentrop Orgelbouw web site: http://www.flentrop.nl
     The Holtkamp Organ Company. Factory Specifications of Paul Recital Hall Organ (1966 and 2002).
     The Holtkamp Organ Company. Factory Specifications of Practice Organ (1969).
     The Holtkamp Organ Company website: http://holtkamporgan.com/
     "Home of the Institute of Musical Art," The New York Times (Sep. 10, 1905).
     Huxtable, Ada Louise. "Juilliard's New Building: Esthetic Reality," The New York Times (Oct. 8, 1969).
     The Juilliard School web site: http://www.juilliard.edu
     Kinzey, Allen, and Sand Lawn, comps. E.M. Skinner/Aeolian-Skinner Opus List (New Revised Edition). Richmond: The Organ Historical Society, 1997.
     Estey Pipe Organs web site: http://esteyorgan.com/
     Montagne, Renee and Miles Hoffman. "The Venerable Juilliard, Turning 100," Morning Edition, National Public Radio (May 20, 2005).
     The Noack Organ Company web site: http://www.noackorgan.com
     Olmstead, Andrea. Juilliard: A History. Champaign, Ill.: University of Illinois Press, 1999.
     Scheer, Stanley. Factory Specifications of Casavant Frères Console, Op. 1860 (1946).
     Scheer, Stanley. Factory Specifications of Casavant Frères Organ, Op. 1440 (1931).
     Schonberg, Harold C. "Paul Recital Hall: Little but Exquisite," The New York Times (Dec. 2, 1970).
     Scofield, Jeff. M.P. Möller, Inc. Opus List.
     Smith, Rollin. The Aeolian Pipe Organ and Its Music. Richmond: The Organ Historical Society, 1998. Specifications of Aeolian Organ, Op. 998 (1905).
     Stimmel, Phil. Estey Organ Company Shop Orders with specifications of Estey Organs Op. 806 (1910), Op. 818 (1910) and Op. 819 (1910).
     Trupiano, Larry. Correspondence and specifications of Hillgreen, Lane & Co. Organs, Op. 781 (1924) and Op. 772 (1924).
     Trupiano, Larry. Factory Contract for Aeolian-Skinner organ, Op. 1272 (1955).

Illustrations:
     The American Organist (August 1924). Hillgreen, Lane & Co. advertisement showing organ in Institute of Musical Art. Courtesy Larry Trupiano.
     Callahan, Charles. Aeolian-Skinner Organ, Op. 1272 (1955).
     The Holtkamp Organ Company. Interior of Paul Hall showing the 1969 Holtkamp Organ.
     The Juilliard School Archives. Iinterior of Concert Hall (Borden Auditorium); Impact Photos, Inc.
     The Juilliard School Archives. Interior of Organ Studio, Flentrop Organ (1969); Ezra Stoller (ESTO), photographer.
     The Juilliard School web site. Exterior of Lincoln Center Campus.
     Lawson, Steven E. Photo of Flentrop Orgelbouw Organ (1969).
     Lawson, Steven E. Photos of Holtkamp Organ (rev. 2002) in Paul Hall.
     Lawson, Steven E. Photo of Noack Organ (1969).
     Lawson, Steven E. Photos of Schoenstein Organ, Op. 158 (2010).
     Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Collection. 1910 photo of Institute of Musical Art.
     The New York Architect (Nov. 1910, Vol. 4, No. 11). Interior of auditorium, Institute of Musical Art, showing Estey Organ, Op. 806 (1910). Courtesy The Juilliard School Archives.
     Taube, Alton. 1950 photo showing The Juilliard Graduate School and Institute of Musical Art.