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William Douglas Sloane Residence

2 West 52nd Street at Fifth Avenue (aka 642 Fifth Avenue)
New York, N.Y. 10019


Organ Specifications:
III/31 Aeolian Company, Op. 1094 (1909)
• III/38 Geo. S. Hutchings, Op. 448 (1898)




Emily Thorn Vanderbilt Sloane with William Douglas Sloane (1914) (photo: Robert Bruce Collection)  
Emily Thorn Vanderbilt Sloane
and William Douglas Sloane (1914)
 
William Douglas Sloane (1844-1915) was the third son of William and Euphemia Douglas Sloane. He was born in New York City on February 29, 1844, and at the age of 15 began working with the firm of W. & J. Sloane, the furniture company of which his father was a founder. He became a member of the firm in 1866, and when it was incorporated in 1891 he became a Director and remained a member of the board until his death.

Emily Thorn Vanderbilt (1852-1946) was a member of the prominent United States Vanderbilt family.The second daughter of William Henry Vanderbilt (1821-1885) and Maria Louisa Kissam (1821-1896), Emily Thorn Vanderbilt was named after her aunt, Emily Almira (Vanderbilt) Thorn, daughter of dynasty founder Cornelius Vanderbilt. She married William Douglas Sloane, and they had three daughters and two sons. After Sloane's death, Emily married Henry White, in 1920, American Ambassador to France and Italy, and a signer of the Treaty of Versailles.

Find a Grave: Emily Vanderbilt Sloane White. Second daughter, and fourth child, of William Henry Vanderbilt (1821-1885), and Maria Louisa Kissam Vanderbilt (1821-1896); grandaughter of 'Commodore' Cornelius Vanderbilt (1794-1877), founder of the family fortune. Wife of William Douglas Sloane (1844-1915), president of the W. & J. Sloane Company; furniture makers and decorators. Charitably minded, together they founded the Sloane Maternity Hospital in New York, the first of its kind. Renowned hostess of New York aristocracy's golden era, who, along with her sister, Florence Vanderbilt Twombly; her sister-in-law, Mrs. Cornelius Vanderbilt; and friends, Ruth Livingston Mills, and Mrs. Elbridge T. Gerry, came to exercise complete dominance over "Old Guard" New York and Newport Society. Widowed five years, in 1920 she married superb diplomat, and family friend, Henry White, a widower of age seventy. In the words of Theodore Roosevelt, "The most useful man in the entire diplomatic service." Widowed again, in 1927, she lived on for another score of years entertaining at her New York townhouse, and at her vast country estate, 'Elm Court', in Lenox, Massachusetts ~ of 93 rooms it was the largest shingle-style house ever constructed; its greenhouses, providing flowers and fruits in all seasons, covered over two acres of land. At moments she had moved those on Fifth Avenue, and in Lenox, with the fatal luxury of her exquisite maroon Rolls Royce, of the Vanderbilt fleet. Her ample fortune allowing such elegance throughout her lifetime. Passing away peacefully in Lenox, her service was held there at Trinity Church, with music provided by her favorite organist, Archer Gibson, assisted by Johnston F. Stewart.
         
  Aeolian Organ, Op. 1094 (1909) in William Douglas Sloane Residence - New York City
Aeolian Company
New York City – Opus 1094 (1909)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 40 stops, 31 ranks



The second organ in Mr. Sloane's residence was built in 1909 by the Aeolian Company. In the contract dated March 3, 1909, Aeolian stated that the new organ would be installed in the existing organ chamber and bellows room used by the 1898 George S. Hutchings organ, and the console "containing keyboards and Aeolienne for music-roll playing to be centered in front of Organ." Aeolian retained the casework and recently ordered blowing apparatus of the Hutchings organ, and agreed that "No charge [was] to be made for work done on old [Hutchings] organ during the years 1908-09." The new organ was to be delivered and installed on or about October 15, 1909, and would be "maintained in tune for one year from date of completion without charge." The total cost of the organ was $17,000. The Aeolian Contract Specification did not include pipecounts but they are suggested below, based on similar Aeolian organs of the era.

In 1926, Mrs. Henry White (the former Mrs. Sloane) arranged to have the Aeolian Company move and reinstall the organ in Trinity Church, Lenox, Mass. The contract of March 3, 1926, shows that Aeolian incorporated four ranks from the church's old organ and provided a new blower for a consideration of $6,305. This organ was later rebuilt twice by the Aeolian-Skinner Company as Op. 1013 (1940) and Op. 1051 (1944).
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Diapason F
61
4
  Flute (high)
61
8
  Diapason MF
61
8
  Flute (Quintadena)
61
8
  String F
61
2
  Piccolo
61
8
  String P
61
8
  Clarinet
61
8
  Flute F
61
8
  Trumpet
61
8
  Flute P
61
       
               
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  String F
61
8
  Flute
61
8
  String (vibrato) F [TC]
49
4
  Flute (high)
61
8
  String P
61
16
  Flute (deep)
61
8
  String (vibrato) P [TC]
49
8
  Oboe
61
8
  String PP
61
8
  Vox Humana F
61
8
  String (mixture) P (5 ranks)
305
8
  Vox Humana P

     

     
Choir Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes (Duplication of Manual I)
8
  Diapason F
4
  Flute (high)
8
  Diapason MF
8
  Flute (Quintadena)
8
  String F
2
  Piccolo
8
  String P
8
  Clarinet
8
  Flute F
8
  Trumpet
8
  Flute P
       
               
Pedal Organ – 30 notes
16
  Flute (deep) F
30
16
  String (deep) F
30
16
  Flute (deep) P
SW
8
  String F
SW
8
  Flute
30
16
  Trumpet (deep)
30
               
Percussion Instruments
   
Harp (augmented)
61 notes
   (playable from either Manual II or III)
   
Chimes
20 notes
   (playable from either Manual I or II)
               
Couplers
    Swell to Pedal 8', 4'     Swell to Choir 8'
    Great to Pedal 8', 4'     Great 16', 4', Unison Release
    Choir to Pedal 8'     Swell 16', 4', Unison Release
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'     Choir 16', 4', Unison Release
    Choir to Great 8'      
           
Adjustable Combination Pistons (Operating on all Manual and Pedal Stops)
    Great Organ I, II, III, IV, Release
    Swell Organ I, II, III, IV, Release
    Choir Organ I, II, III, IV, Release
    General Release
               
Adjustable Combination Pedals (Operating on all Manual and Pedal Stops)
    Tutti I, II, III, IV
               
Accessories
    Sforzando Pedal     Great and Choir Organ Tremolo
    Tonal Pedal     Swell Organ Tremolo
    Swell Expression Pedal     Great to Pedal Reversible
    Great and Choir Expression Pedal    
           
Aeolienne
   
Normal
}
  Pedal Release
   
Reverse
} Aeolienne Control, 116-note music
  Aeolian Ventil
   
Unison
}
  Aeolian Tempo
   
Ventil
58-note music
  Aeolian Reroll
         
George S. Hutchings
Boston, Mass. – Opus 448 (1898)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 38 stops


Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
           
Sources:
     Smith, Rollin. The Aeolian Pipe Organ and its Music. Richmond: The Organ Historical Society, 1998.
     Trupiano, Larry. Factory Contract (Mar. 3, 1909) of Aeolian Organ, Op. 1094 (1909).
     Trupiano, Larry. Factory Contract (Mar. 3, 1926) to move Aeolian Organ, Op. 1094 (1909).

Illustrations:
     Columbia University School of Architecture. Vanderbilt Houses.
     Robert Bruce Collection. Photo of Emily Thorn Vanderbilt Sloane and William Douglas Sloane (1914).
     Trupiano, Larry. Organ case and console of Aeolian Organ, Op. 1094 (1909).