Rutgers Presbyterian Church - New York City
Rutgers Presbyterian Church

236 West 73rd Street at Broadway
New York, N.Y. 10023
http://www.rutgerschurch.com


Organ Specifications:
236 West 73rd Street (since 1926)
IV/73 Southfield Organ Builders, Op. 66 (2005)
IV/44 M.P. Möller, Inc., Op. 4276 (1926)
II/6 M.P. Möller, Inc., Op. 4277 (1926) – Chapel
Broadway corner 73rd Street (1890-1926)
Church building (1890-1926)
II/22 Frank Roosevelt, Op. 436 (1890)
Chapel building (1888-1926)
• unknown
90 Madison Avenue at 29th Street (1863-1888)
Second building (1873-1888)
• unknown. Ferris & Stuart moved?
First building (1863-1873) – orig. Lenox Chapel
II/18 Ferris & Stuart (1870)
Rutgers and Henry Streets (1798-1863)
Second building (1842-1863) –now St. Teresa R.C. Church
•III/36 Thomas Robjohn (1845)
First building (1798-1842)
•unknown, if any


When the first Rutgers congregation dedicated its first sanctuary on the corner of Henry and Rutgers Streets in Lower Manhattan on May 13, 1798, that congregation and sanctuary were the third unit of the Collegiate Presbyterian Church of New York City. It was north and east of the previous two units: the Church on Wall Street, now First Presbyterian (founded in 1716) and the New Church, now Brick Presbyterian (founded in 1765) at Beekman and Ann Streets. It was built on a plot of ground donated by Colonel Henry Rutgers, and paid for by contributions from the members. The three units shared the services of a three-person ministerial team, of which the Reverend Dr. John Rodgers was senior pastor.

 
   
In 1809, each of these three units was separately incorporated, and the Reverend Dr. Philip Milledolar was assigned as pastor to the Rutgers Street Church. By 1830, during the pastorates of two successors, Rutgers had become the largest Presbyterian church in the denomination, with 1,157 members. The old frame church was replaced in 1843 with a large stone structure (still standing and in use as the Roman Catholic Church of St. Teresa of Avila). Because of the dynamic growth of the city and the profound demographic changes thereby brought about, the congregation decided in 1863 to move "uptown," taking over the Lenox Chapel at 29th and Madison, where a small, pastorless Presbyterian congregation was in residence. That group eventually became members of Rutgers, under the inspiring leadership of the Reverend Dr. John M. Krebs, who had been called to Rutgers in 1830 and spent his entire career there (1830-1867). Although the membership was now less than half of its all-time high (many additional Presbyterian churches having been opened in the city), the congregation, in 1873, demolished the Lenox Chapel and built an elaborate, expensive church on the spot.

  Rutgers Presbyterian Church (1873-1888) - New York City (King's Handbook of New York, 1892)
Again, population changes, and the post-Civil War prosperity that transformed the church neighborhood into a largely business district, eroded the membership to an alarmingly low level. By 1884 the congregation was considering dissolution and the sale of the property. The church was closed for nine months. But a devoted core of officers and members invited the Rev. Dr. Robert Russell Booth (then at liberty and a charismatic presence) to head the church, which reopened at the end of January 1885. But the location of the church remained a hindrance to real growth, and in 1887 the congregation accepted the invitation of the Presbytery's Church Extension Committee to move to a newly opening section of the city at 73rd and Broadway. Through proceeds from the sale of the Madison Avenue property, a chapel was built in 1888 (approximately on the site of the present sanctuary), and a large church in the Romanesque style on the corner was dedicated in 1890.

Rutgers Presbyterian Church - NYC (Photo: John Rust)  
At the new location and under the new leadership, the church flourished, as the Upper West Side underwent a building boom and acquired a considerable social cachet. By the time Rutgers celebrated its 100th Anniversary in 1898, it had 386 members, many of whom were prominent in civic circles. With the arrival of the Reverend Dr. Daniel Russell in 1915 (he remained as pastor for 27 years) another period of growth and change began. In 1925, when the membership was 445, the existing plant was demolished and the present aggregation of sanctuary, church house and bank building was erected.
               
 
Console of Southfield organ, Op. 62 (2003) & Op. 66 (2005) in Rutgers Presbyterian Church - New York City (Photo: John Rust)
Southfield Organ Builders, Inc.
Springfield, Mass. – Opus 62 (2003), Opus 66 (2005)
Electro-pneumatic slider and unit action
Digital stops by Marshall and Ogletree
4 manuals, 87 registers, 61 stops, 73 ranks





Southfield Organ Builders of Springfield, Mass., built a new organ in Rutgers Presbyterian Church, installing it in two phases during 2003 and 2005. The four-manual organ has a total of 70 ranks, plus 3 digitals ranks by Marshall and Ogletree. Several ranks from the previous Möller organ, Op. 4276 (1926), were retained and revoiced, and the 1926 Möller drawknob console shell was refitted with upgraded controls and made movable. The new organ was dedicated by Ken Cowan on Sunday, May 22, 2005.

               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
16
  Dbl. Open Diapason *
73
1 1/3
  Mixture IV ranks
244
16
  Gemshorn
85
8
  Cornet IV ranks (TC)
196
8
  Open Diapason * (fr. 16')
16
  Double Trumpet
61
8
  Harmonic Flute *
61
8
  Trumpet *
61
8
  Doppelflute *
61
    Tremolo  
8
  Gemshorn (fr. 16')
  Great Unison Off  
4
  Octave *
61
    Great 4'  
4
  Gemshorn
8
  Trompette en Chamade
ANT
4
  Koppelflöte
61
 
  MIDI on Great  
2
  Fifteenth
61
    Zimbelstern  
               
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon *
68
1 1/3
  Larigot
61
8
  Open Diapason
68
(1)
  Plein Jeu IV ranks
244
8
  Viola
68
(8)
  Sesquialtera II ranks
122
8
  Viola Celeste (TC)
56
16
  Double Trumpet *
68
8
  Stopped Diapason
68
8
  French Trumpet *
68
8
  Salicional *
68
8
  Oboe *
68
8
  Voix Celeste (TC) *
56
8
  Vox Humana *
68
8
  Flauto Dolce
68
4
  Clarion *
68
8
  Flute Celeste (TC)
56
    Tremolo  
4
  Spitz Principal
68
    Swell 16'  
4
  Rohrflöte
68
    Swell Unison Off  
2
  Principal
61
    Swell 4'  
2
  Flautino *
61
    MIDI on Swell  
               
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Double Dulciana *
92
1 3/5
  Tierce
61
8
  English Diapason *
68
16
  Bassoon
68
8
  Concert Flute *
68
8
  Clarinet *
68
8
  Gedeckt
68
8
  English Trumpet
68
8
  Dulciana * (fr. 16')
4
  Rohr Schalmei
68
8
  Unda Maris (TC) *
56
    Tremolo  
4
  Principal
68
8
  Harp (TC)
4
  Spitzflöte
68
4
 
Celesta
49 bars
4
  Octave Dulciana * (fr. 16')
    Choir 16'  
2 2/3
  Nazard
61
    Choir Unison Off
2
  Octave
61
    Choir 4'  
2
  Concert Piccolo *
61
    MIDI on Choir  
               
Antiphonal Organ (Manual IV) – 61 notes, partially enclosed
8
  Principal * +
80
8
  Vox Humana
68
8
  Echo Flute *
80
8
  Trompette en Chamade
61
8
  Muted Viol
68
    Tremolo  
8
  Vox Angelica (TC)
56
 
  Chimes  
4
  Octave + (fr. 8' Princ.)
 
  Antiphonal Unison Off  
4
  Fern Flute * (fr. Echo Fl.)
 
  Antiphonal 4'  
2
  Fifteenth +
61
 
  MIDI on Antiphonal  
           
+ unenclosed
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
32
 
Contre Diapason
digital
4
  Choral Bass (fr. Dbl. O.D.)
32
 
Contre Bourdon
digital
4
  Nachthorn
32
16
  Double Open Diap. *
56
4
  Gemshorn
GT
16
  Principal
GT
2 2/3
  Mixture III ranks
96
16
  Bourdon *
44
32
 
Contre Bombarde
digital
16
  Gemshorn
GT
16
  Trombone *
56
16
  Lieblich Gedeckt
SW
16
  Double Trumpet
SW
16
  Double Dulciana
CH
16
  Bassoon
CH
16
  Antiphonal Bourdon
32
8
  Tromba (fr. Trombone)
8
  Diapason (fr. Dbl. O.D.)
8
  Trumpet
CH
8
  Octave
32
4
  Clarion (fr. Trombone)
8
  Flute (fr. Bourdon)
4
  Cremona
CH
8
  Still Gedeckt
SW
 
  MIDI on Pedal  
               
* ranks rebuilt and revoiced from M.P. Moller organ, Op. 4276 (1926)
               
Couplers
    Great to Pedal 8', 4'     Antiphonal to Great 8', 4'
    Swell to Pedal 8', 4'     Swell to Choir 16', 8', 4'
    Choir to Pedal 8', 4'     Antiphonal to Choir 8'
    Antiphonal to Pedal 8'     Choir/Great Manual Transfer
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'     Tower Carillon
    Choir to Great 16', 8', 4'     Antiphonal Carillon
           
Adjustable Combinations
   
Antiphonal Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb)
Swell Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8 (thumb)
Great Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8 (thumb)
Choir Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8 (thumb)
Pedal Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb & toe)
Full Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11-12 (thumb & toe)
           
Reversibles
    Great to Pedal (thumb & toe)   Swell to Choir (thumb)
    Swell to Pedal (thumb & toe)   Antiphonal to Choir (thumb)
    Choir to Pedal (thumb & toe)   Full Organ (thumb & toe)
    Antiphonal to Pedal (thumb & toe)   32' Contre Diapason (thumb)
    Swell to Great (thumb & toe)   32' Contre Bourdon (thumb)
    Choir to Great (thumb & toe)   32' Contre Bombarde (thumb)
    Antiphonal to Great (thumb)    
           
Expression
    Balanced Swell Pedal   Balanced Antiphonal Pedal
    Balanced Choir Pedal   Crescendo Pedal
           
Console of Southfield organ, Op. 62 (2003) & Op. 66 (2005) in Rutgers Presbyterian Church - New York City (Photo: John Rust)   Antiphonal and Chamade of Southfield organ, Op. 62 (2003) & Op. 66 (2005) in Rutgers Presbyterian Church - New York City (Photo: John Rust)
               
M. P. Möller, Inc.
Hagerstown, Md. – Opus 4276 (1926)
Electro-pneumatic action
4 manuals, 56 registers, 42 stops, 44 ranks


The original organ in the present sanctuary was built by M.P. Möller of Hagerstown, Md. Möller provided an organ case of plain white oak, and a four-manual drawknob console. Möller also reused most of the pipes from the 1890 Frank Roosevelt organ (Op. 436) that was in the previous church. In the contract dated March 18, 1925, is the following clause:

Party of the first part [Möller] agrees to build and finish the organ to the entire satisfaction and supervision of Mr. Edward Shippen Barnes, or any other expert named by party of the second part [Rutgers], and to construct the console so that the pistons operate the draw knobs and stop keys, noiselessly and instantaneously. The voicing is to be done to the entire satisfaction of said expert. Party of the first part will revoice or replace any set or sets of pipes if ncessary. It is also understood that quality and delivery date are to be the essence of this contract.

The organ was dedicated during the morning service on March 13, 1926.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, partially enclosed
16
  Open Diapason
73
4
  Flute Harmonic + *
61
8
  Open Diapason *
61
2 2/3
  Twelfth + *
61
8
  Open Diapason (fr. 16')
2
  Fifteenth + *
61
8
  Doppel Flute + *
61
  Mixture III ranks + *
183
8
  Melodia +
61
8
  Tuba +
61
4
  Octave + *
61
   
+ enclosed in separate swell box
               
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon *
73
4
  Gemshorn *
73
8
  Open Diapason
73
4
  Wald Flute *
73
8
  Violin Diapason *
73
2
  Flautina *
61
8
  Viole d'Orchestre
73
16
  Double Trumpet
73
8
  Salicional
73
8
  French Trumpet
73
8
  Vox Celeste
73
8
  Oboe
73
8
  Aeoline*
73
8
  Vox Humana
73
8
  Spitz Flute *
73
4
  Clarion
61
8
  Stopped Diapason *
73
       
               
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Double Dulciana
85
4
  Rohr Flute
73
8
  English Open Diapason
73
4
  Octave Dulciana (fr. 16')
8
  Dulciana (fr. 16')
2
  Concert Piccolo (Harm.)
61
8
  Unda Maris (TC)
61
8
  Clarinet (Orchestral)
73
8
  Violoncello
73
8
 
Celesta (TC)
49 bars
8
  Concert Flute
73
4
  Celesta
               
Echo Organ (Manual IV) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Echo Flute
73
4
  Violin (fr. 8')
4
  Fern Flute (fr. 8')
8
  Vox Humana
61
8
  Muted Viole
73
   
Chimes [Deagan "A"]
25 tubes
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
16
  Open Diapason *
32
8
  Still Gedeckt
SW
16
  Second Open Diapason
44
8
  Diapason (fr. 2nd O.D.)
16
  Open Diapason
GT
8
  Violoncello
CH
16
  Double Dulciana
CH
16
  Double Trumpet
SW
16
  Bourdon *
44
16
  Trombone
44
16
  Lieblich Gedeckt
SW
8
  Tromba
8
  Flute (fr. Bourdon)
     
* ranks retained from Frank Roosevelt organ, Op. 436 (1890)
Couplers
    Great to Pedal 8', 4'   Swell to Choir 16', 8', 4'
    Swell to Pedal 8', 4'   Swell 16', 4', Unison Off
    Choir to Pedal 8'   Choir 16', 4', Unison Off
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'   Echo on Great Off
    Choir to Great 16', 8', 4'   Echo to Great
         
Mechanicals
    Great Tremulant   Crescendo Indicator
    Swell Tremulant   Sforzando Indicator
    Choir Tremulant   Generator Indicator
    Echo Tremulant    
         
Adjustable Combination Pistons
   
Echo Organ Pistons 1-2-3 & 0 (thumb)
Swell Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 & 0 (thumb)
Great Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 & 0 (thumb) and Pedal ON & OFF
Choir Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 & 0 (thumb)
Pedal Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 & 0 (thumb)
Full Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 & 0 (thumb)
               
By Manual Pistons – Not Reversible
    Pedal 16' off Pedal Stops } Under Great to right
    Manual 16' off Manual Stops }
               
Pedal Movements
    Grand Crescendo Pedal
    Balanced Expression Pedal affecting Great Organ
    Balanced Expression Pedal affecting Swell Organ
    Balanced Expression Pedal affecting Choir Organ
    Balanced Expression Pedal affecting Echo Organ
    Reversible Stud affecting Full Organ (Sforzando)
    Reversible Stud affecting Great to Pedal Coupler
    Reversible Stud affecting Swell to Pedal Coupler
    Reversible Stud affecting Swell to Great 4' Coupler
    Reversible Stud affecting Swell 4' Coupler
    Reversible Stud off Great 16' Open
               
Chapel Organ

M. P. Möller, Inc.
Hagerstown, Md. – Opus 4277 (1926)
Electro-pneumatic action
2 manuals, 10 registers, 6 stops, 6 ranks


When the present church facilities were opened in 1926, the chapel contained a small organ built by M. P. Möller. The six ranks of pipes were voiced on 5" wind pressure, and were controlled by a two-manual stop-key console. All of the pipes were enclosed in one expression box.
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Diapason Phonon
61
8
  Echo Salicional
61
8
  Stopped Diapason
61
4
  Flute Traverso
61
               
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Gedeckt
GT
8
  Echo Salicional
GT
4
  Flute
GT
8
  Vox Celeste (TC)
49
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
16
  Bourdon
44
8
  Bass Flute (fr. Bourdon)
               
Couplers
    Great to Pedal 8'     Great 16', 4', Unison Separation
    Swell to Pedal 8'     Swell 16', 4', Unison Separation
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'      
               
Mechanicals
    Tremulant          
    Crescendo Indicator          
               
Adjustable Combinations
    Pistons No. 1-2-3 affecting Great and Pedal Stops
    Pistons No. 1-2-3 affecting Swell and Pedal Stops
               
Pedal Movements
    Great to Pedal Reversible      
    Balanced Swell Pedal      
    Grand Crescendo Pedal      
               
Organ in previous church on corner of Broadway and 73rd Street:

Frank Roosevelt
New York City – Opus 436 (1890)
Tracker-pneumatic action
2 manuals, 20 stops, 22 ranks


The organ in the previous church building, on the corner of Broadway and 73rd Street, was built in 1890 by Frank Roosevelt of New York City. Lynwood Farnam (1885-1930), noted concert organist of the early 20th century, recorded the following specifications, which are a slight variation of Roosevelt's "Style Thirty-Five."
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 58 notes
8
  Open Diapason
58
4
  Octave
58
8
  Viola di Gamba
58
2 2/3
  Twelfth *
58
8
  Doppel Flute
58
2
  Fifteenth *
58
8
  Spitz Flute
58
8
  Trumpet *
58
4
  Hohl Flöte
58
 
 
* enclosed in Swell box
               
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 58 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon (bass & treble) +
58
4
  Flute Harmonique
58
8
  Violin Diapason
58
2
  Flautina
58
8
  Dolce [1-12 grooved to St. Diap.]
46
    Cornet, 3 ranks
174
8
  Stopped Diapason
58
8
  Oboe
58
4
  Gemshorn
58
   
+ split knob
               
Pedal Organ – 30 notes
16
  Open Wood
30
       
16
  Bourdon
30
       
               
Couplers (over Swell manual)
    Great to Pedal       Swell to Great  
    Swell to Pedal       Swell to Great Octaves  
               
Mechanical Accessories
    Swell Tremulant       Eclipse Wind Indicator  
           
Pedal Movements
    2 adjustable composition pedals to Great   Great to Pedal reversible coupler
    2 adjustable composition pedals to Swell   Full Organ Pedal
        Balanced Swell Pedal  
               
Organ in previous church at 90 Madison Avenue:

Ferris & Stuart
New York City (1870)
Mechanical action
2 manuals, 22 registers, 16 stops, 18 ranks
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 56 notes
8
  Open Diapason
56
4
  Principal
56
8
  Salicional
56
2
  Fifteenth
56
8
  Stop Diapason (wood)
56
    Sesquialtera, 3 ranks
168
4
  Flute Harmonic
56
       
               
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 56 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon
56
8
  Dulciana
56
8
  Open Diapason
56
4
  Principal
56
8
  Stop Diapason, Bass (wood)
56
8
  Hautbois
56
8
  Stop Diapason, Treble (wood)
8
  Vox Humana
56
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
16
  Double Open Diapason (wood)
32
       
16
  Bourdon (wood)
32
       
               
Couplers, or Mechanical Stops
    Great and Swell       Vox Tremulant  
    Swell and Pedal       Bellows Alarm  
    Great and Pedal          
               

Organ in second church at Rutgers and Henry Streets:

Thomas Robjohn
New York City (1845)
Mechanical action
3 manuals, 36 stops


Although the specification has not yet been located, the 1861 American Musical Directory stated that this organ had "3 banks keys, 36 stops, 2 octaves pedals. Built by Thomas Robjohn." However, an article in the "City Intelligence" column of The Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Nov. 13, 1845) provides a more detailed description:

As organ-trying seems to constitute an attractive feature in music nowadays, we feel bound to indicate to our readers those places where it may be heard in its greatest perfection. From the fact that this kind of entertainment is afforded without charge the audiences are particularly large. This evening, at 7 o'clock, the splendid instrument in the Rutgers street church, corner of Henry, in New York, is to undergo another trial. A brilliant array of talent will be present on this occasion, made up of the following professors: Messrs. Greatorex, King, Erben, Taylor, of this city, Munson, Jones, Bcamos, Kingsley, Jackson, Bristow, Scharfenberg, Harrison, Lanckenau, A. Hodges, Carrington, Russell, &c— An uncommonly rich treat of music may therefore be expected, interspersed with duetts. This organ is a first class instrument, and was built by Mr. Robjohn. We have been furnished with the following description: It has 3 benches of keys, 2 octaves of pedals, triple swell and quadruple front, 2 bellows, high and low pressure, each 10 ft. by 6 ft. 6 in.; 37 stops, 10 in the great organ, 10 in the swell, and 7 in the choir; 7 couplers, 2 stops in pedals, from one set of pipes, so arranged that the wind can be taken from the high or low pressure bellows, making a loud and soft stop. The case of the organ is 33 ft. high, 17 ft. wide, 15 ft. 7 in. deep, longest pipe 16 ft. long, 1/8 in. diameter.
     The public are invited to attend this even. Mr. Robjohn is the organist of the church, and Mr. Charles Holt, of this city, chorister.
               
Sources:
     American Musical Directory. New York: Thomas Hutchinson, 1861.
     "City Intellegence," The Brooklyn Daily Eagle (Nov. 13, 1845). Article about organ exhibition. Courtesy James Lewis.
     Dunlap, David W. From Abyssinian to Zion: A Guide to Manhattan's Houses of Worship. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004.
     Farnam, Lynnwood. Specification of Frank Roosevelt organ, Op. 436 (1890). "Organ Notebook," p.483. John de Lancie Library, The Curtis Institute of Music, Philadelphia; Sally Branca, Archivist. Courtesy Jonathan Bowen.
     King, Moses. Handbook of New York City: An Outline History & Description of the American Metropolis. Boston: Moses King, 1892.
     Roberts, Vera Mowry. The Story of Rutgers Church. New York: Rutgers Presbyterian Church, 1998.
     "Hilborne L. Roosevelt, Manufacturer of Church, Chapel, Concert and Chamber Organs," catalog pub. by Roosevelt Organ Works (Dec. 1888); republished by The Organ Literature Foundation, Braintree, Mass., 1978.
     Rutgers Presbyterian Church website: http://www.rutgerschurch.com
     Trupiano, Larry. Factory Specification of M.P. Möller organ, Op. 4276 (1926)
     Trupiano, Larry. Factory Specification of M.P. Möller organ, Op. 4277 (1926)
     Trupiano, Larry. "Scheme of the Organ in Rutgers Presbyterian Church, New York City, built in 1870."

Illustrations:
     King, Moses. Handbook of New York City: An Outline History & Description of the American Metropolis. Boston: Moses King, 1892: Scottish Rite Hall (former Rutgers Presbyterian Church).
     Rust, John. Southfield organ, Op. 62 (2003) and Op. 66 (2005).
     Rutgers Presbyterian Church website. Drawings of earlier church buildings.