St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
Click on images to enlarge
St. Bartholomew's Church
(Episcopal)


325 Park Avenue at 51st Street
New York, N.Y. 10022
http://www.stbarts.org





Organ Specifications:
325 Park Avenue at 51st Street (since 1918):
V/225 Aeolian-Skinner Co., Op. 275-E/F (1970-71)
V/160 Aeolian-Skinner Co., Op. 275-A/B/D (1937, 1950-53, 1967)
–/24 Skinner Organ Company, Op. 832 (1930) – Celestial
V/ Skinner Organ Company, Op. 651 (1927) – console
IV/115 Ernest M. Skinner Company, Op. 275 (1917)
III/15 M.P. Möller, Inc., Op. 2424 (1917)
343 Madison Avenue at 44th Street (1872-1918):
IV/100 George S. Hutchings, Op. 402 (1893)
IV/57 George S. Hutchings, Op. 328 (1893) – Chancel
–/43 George S. Hutchings, Op. 329 (1893) – Gallery
III/46 J.H. & C.S. Odell, Op. 112 (1872)
Lafayette Place at Great Jones Street (1835-1872):
• II/24 Henry Erben (1839)

See also the pages for the Continuo, Chapel,
and the Former Parish House and Clinic.


St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church, located from 1835-1872 on Lafayette Place and Great Jones Street - New York City  
Lafayette Place  
St. Bartholomew's Protestant Episcopal Church was founded in 1835, with the Rev. Charles Vernon Kelly serving as its first rector. In 1835-36, a church in neo-classical style with a Gothic or Regency spire was erected at a cost of $33,000 on Lafayette Place at Great Jones Street. It was a time of "unprecedented prosperity, when the price of land and the cost of building was at the peak." The Panic of 1837 brought an abrupt end to widespread speculation and inflated values. Due to the financial exingency throughout the country, St. Bartholomew's suffered financially, and Rev. Kelly resigned in 1838. For the next fifty years, the church struggled with inadequate finances despite having a communicant list that was larger than any other New York Episcopal church, including some of the wealthiest and most aristocratic families.

  St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church, located from 1872-1918 on Madison Avenue and 44th Street - New York City
  Madison Avenue at 44th Street (1918)
Under the guidance of its third rector, the Rev. Dr. Samuel Cooke, the church moved uptown to the southwest corner of Madison Avenue and Forty-fourth Street. The land was purchased at a good price from the New York and Harlem Railroad, as arranged through the offices of William H. Vanderbilt, a parishioner. The second St. Bartholomew's Church was designed by James Renwick, Jr., of Renwick and Sands, whose previous commissions included the Smithsonian Institution Building, Grace Church, St. Patrick's Cathedral, and many mansions for wealthy New Yorkers. Renwick's plan for St. Bartholomew's was in a quasi-Lombardic style, built of solid granite and including a tall campanile at the corner. There was a frontage of 70 feet on Madison Avenue, and the church extended for 100 feet along Forty-fourth Street. The interior was divided into nave and two aisles, separated by twelve columns—six on each side—of Aberdeen granite of alternating red and gray colors. Above both aisles was a triforium arcade, from which slendor convoluted arches rose to become rib vaulting for the ceiling that was fifty feet above the floor. Large ornamental standards of bronze and wall brackets contained gas jets for illumination, and the church had the latest heating and ventilation system. The church complex, which included a rectory and school, was built from 1872-76 at a cost of $228,584.

St. Bartholomew's Church (c.1928) - New York City  
Parish House & Clinic  
In 1888, the Rev. David H. Greer became rector of St. Bartholomew's. Rev. Greer led his new congregation to fight elitism and become an "institutional parish" that provides social services in addition to worship and instruction. Under Greer's leadership, the church opened six Sunday schools in five languages, established a Rescue Mission at 116 East 42nd Street, and had built a large Parish House and Medical Clinic, at 205-208 East 42nd Street, to serve the lower middle class. The Vanderbilt family was especially generous in their support of these community projects.

From 1902 to 1903, an elaborate portal designed by Stanford White was added, given by Alice Gwynne Vanderbilt and children as a memorial to Cornelius Vanderbilt, who had died in 1899. The Lombardic-Romanesque portal was inspired by the abbey of Saint-Gilles-du-Gard in Provence.

In 1904, the Rev. Dr. Leighton Parks became rector of St. Bartholomew's, coming from Emmanuel Church in Boston. Parks espoused the ministry of beauty which included architecture and great music. In 1905, he convinced Leopold Stokowski to move from London to become choirmaster and organist at St. Bartholomew's. Stokowski left in 1908, and was succeeded by Arthur S. Hyde, a student of Charles-Marie Widor. As Grand Central Terminal was built atop Park Avenue between 1908 and 1913, Dr. Parks saw the opportunity to build a great urban church in a commanding location; he then preached to his congregation that they should give "a great gift of beauty to the city." Although it is not believed that Parks had previous experience with building churches, he had definite ideas about appropriate church architectural styles. To Parks, the Gothic cathedral style was best suited for non-participatory worship where the people were separated from and could not see the priest, while the Romanesque style gathered the people under a unifying dome "to see and hear and participate in the service."

  Bertram Goodhue proposal (1916) for St. Bartholomew's Church - New York City
  Drawing of Proposed Church
In May 1914, the vestry was authorized to purchase (for $1.4 million) an irregularly-shaped lot on the east side of Park Avenue, between 50th and 51st Streets, that was formerly occupied by the Schaefer Brewing Company. The Arts Committee, headed by Alvin Krech, one of the most prominent members of the vestry, recommended that Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue receive the commission to design the new church. Alice Vanderbilt offered to pay for moving her husband's memorial to the new location, and Goodhue used the Stanford White portal as the basis of his design. The rector wanted a large non-Gothic building that could seat 1,500 people (400 more than the old church), and the vestry wished to finance the land and building with proceeds from the sale of the Madison Avenue property and a portion of the Park Avenue lot. After reviewing several schemes, the committee selected Goodhue's plans for a grand domed edifice in a Byzantine-Romanesque style that was inspired by San Marco in Venice. Goodhue assured the vestry that the steel-framed design could be built for $500,000, although his recently-completed all-stone St. Thomas Church had cost $1.1 million. Starting in 1915, the Park Avenue lot was cleared, contracts were signed, and on May 1, 1917 the cornerstone of the third St. Bartholomew's Church was laid by Bishop David Hummel Greer. By September of that year, the church has spent $280,000 on the building and it was estimated that another $1 million would be needed due to increased costs for material and labor. Goodhue's scheme was truncated, much of the decoration was deleted, and it was decided to temporarily abandon construction of the dome and cloister. Goodhue was asked if he could reuse the pews from the old church, saving the cost of new ones. Many other materials and furnishings from the old building were modified and reused, including some stained glass, the marble paving, chancel rail, choir stalls, the painting over the altar, and the reredos. By the Fall of 1918, the unfinished church could be used, although the exterior on the north side was incomplete, the large Skinner pipe organ was still being installed in the gallery, and burlap and felt covered the walls that would eventually be tiled or otherwise decorated. Finally, on October 20, 1918, the first service in the new church took place before a large congregation.

St. Bartholomew's Church (c.1928) - New York City  
The next year would see the opening of the adjacent Parish House on December 21, 1918, and the landscaping of the garden. By March 1922, Goodhue, concerned that the church was "in some ways a good deal of a barn and, with the exception of the Chapel, doesn't redound at all to my credit," was urging the Building Committee to take action regarding the completion of the interior. The vestry, however, continued its policy that the indebtedness of the church be removed before further work would be undertaken. In April 1923 the $155,000 needed to eliminate the debt was raised, and on May 1, 1923, the church was consecrated. A year later, on April 23, 1924, Bertram Goodhue died, and seven months later, Dr. Parks resigned from his post as rector.

Under the leadership of Rev. Dr. Robert Norwood, successor to Dr. Parks, the church found a renewed enthusiasm to complete and decorate the church. Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue Associates, successor firm to Bertram Goodhue, renegotiated the unfinished contracts and prepared sketches for a Community House. Goodhue's unrealized designs for the interior were reexamined and Alvin Krech, chair of the Art Committee, prepared a report that recommended the use of Byzantine elements, including the mosaics in the apse. At the wish of parishioners – but in contrast to Goodhue's scheme – stained glass replaced the clear or tinted windows and greatly darkened the interior. The new Community House, dedicated on November 29, 1927, was financed and furnished from the $1.6 million sale of the old Parish House on 42nd Street. The five-story building included an auditorium, gymnasium, swimming pool, club rooms, parlours, and a small grill. Finally, the dome and celestial organ were completed at a cost of $750,000 and dedicated on December 9, 1930. The New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission designated the church in 1967.

In 1981, a real estate developer offered a plan to build an office tower on the site of the adjacent community house, ensuring a financial endowment of the church's mission and maintenance. Conflict developed within the parish and between the church and the city over the designated landmark status of the building. In the ensuing years of battle, St. Bart’s became synonymous with the very real issues between the religious community and the historic preservation movement, and with the attendant constitutional questions. The case tortuously worked its way, over eleven years, to the Supreme Court, which in 1991 declined to hear St. Bartholomew’s appeal of the Second Circuit decision. The congregation paid a heavy price for the battle: half the membership left, and charity and relationships were strained. The existing financial problems deepened, and maintenance on the building was deferred. Over time, and under the leadership of the Rev. William Tully, rector, the church rebounded and is once again a strong and vibrant sacred institution in the city.
             
  2006 Console of Aeolian-Skinner Organ, Op. 275-E/F (1970-71) at St. Bartholomew's Church - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
 
2006 Harris Console
  1953 Console of Aeolian-Skinner Organ, Op. 275-E/F (1970-71) in St. Bartholomew's Church - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
 
Aeolian-Skinner Console in 2003
Aeolian-Skinner Company, Inc.
Boston, Mass. – Opus 275-E/F (1970-71)
Electro-pneumatic key and stop action (1970-71)
Solid state combination action (2006)
5 manuals, 163 stops, 225 ranks, 12,307 pipes



The organ in St. Bartholomew's Church had its last major rebuilding in 1970-71, when the Aeolian-Skinner Company of Boston cleaned and releathered the gallery and celestial organs (Opus 275-E), and provided new chests, structures, and many new pipes for the chancel divisions (Opus 275-F). The entire instrument was tonally refinished by Donald M. Gillett of Aeolian-Skinner. This was the final project completed by the Aeolian-Skinner Company, which ceased operations in 1972. The organ comprises 163 stops, 225 ranks, and 12,422 pipes, and is unchanged since 1971. It is the largest organ in New York City.

2006 Console of Aeolian-Skinner Organ, Op. 275-E/F (1970-71) at St. Bartholomew's Church - New York City (photo: Tim Martin)  
During the Spring of 2006, a new, movable five-manual console was installed. Custom-built by Harris Organs, Inc. of Whittier, Calif., the console shell is of quarter-sawn white oak and polished mahogany, and was designed to harmonize visually with St. Bartholomew’s chancel furnishings. It incorporates many stylistic and dimensional elements common to consoles built by Aeolian-Skinner, while taking advantage of developments in electronic technology to offer organists vastly greater flexibility in controlling the tonal resources of this massive musical instrument. Controls for the blowers, lighting and solid state combination system are contained in drawers under the two stop jambs, and the bench is electrically adjustable.
               
2006 Console of Aeolian-Skinner Organ, Op. 275-E/F (1970-71) at St. Bartholomew's Church - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
2006 Console of Aeolian-Skinner Organ, Op. 275-E/F (1970-71) at St. Bartholomew's Church - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
2006 Console of Aeolian-Skinner Organ, Op. 275-E/F (1970-71) at St. Bartholomew's Church - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
               
CHANCEL ORGAN
               
Chancel Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
16
  Violone
61
  Mixture IV-VI ranks
305
16
  Quintade
61
    Scharf IV ranks
244
8
  Principal
61
 
  Kornett III-V ranks
274
8
  Diapason
61
16
  Kontra Trompete
61
8
  Viola da Gamba
61
8
  Trompete
61
8
  Flute harmonique
61
4
  Klarine
61
4
  Principal
61
    Chimes
SO
4
  Spitzflöte
61
    Unison Off  
2 2/3
  Quinte
61
    Bombarde on Great  
2
  Super Octave
61
       

     

     
Chancel Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Flûte conique
61
    Sesquialtera II ranks
122
8
  Diapason
61
    Plein Jeu IV ranks
244
8
  Gambe Conique
61
    Cymbale IV ranks
244
8
  Gambe Conique Celeste
61
16
  Contre Trompette
61
8
  Flûte à Cheminée
61
8
  Trompette
61
8
  Flûte Celeste II ranks
61
8
  Hautbois
61
8
  Choeur des Violes IV ranks
232
4
  Clairon
61
4
  Montre
61
    Tremulant  
4
  Principal Conique
61
   
Harp Celesta
49 bars
4
  Flûte Harmonique
61
   
Sub Celesta
2
  Octavin
61
    Swell 16'  
2
  Flûte Magique
61
    Unison Off  
1 1/3
  Larigot
61
    Swell 4'  
    Sept-Neuf II ranks
122
       
               
Chancel Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Dulciana
61
  Mixture V ranks
305
8
  Viola Pomposa
61
16
  Dulzian
61
8
  Viola Celeste
61
8
  Petite Trompette
61
8
  Dolcan
61
8
  Clarinet
61
8
  Dolcan Celeste
61
4
  Oboe-Schalmey
61
8
  Quintadena
61
    Tremulant  
8
  Holzgedeckt
61
    Harp
SW
4
  Prestant
61
    Choir 16'  
4
  Rohrflöte
61
    Unison Off  
2 2/3
  Nazard
61
    Choir 4'  
2
  Nachthorn
61
    Carillon
CEL
1 3/5
  Tierce
61
       

     

     
Chancel Positiv Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes
16
  Quintflöte
61
1 1/3
  Oktavquinte
61
8
  Prinzipal
61
1
  Sifflöte
61
8
  Spitzgedeckt
61
    Scharf IV-V ranks
281
4
  Octav
61
    Terzian II ranks
122
4
  Koppelflöte
61
    Zimbel II ranks
122
2 2/3
  Nasat
61
16
  Rankett
61
2
  Oktavlein
61
8
  Krummhorn
61
2
  Flachflöte
61
    Tremulant  
1 3/5
  Terz
61
    Unison Off  

     

     
Chancel Solo Organ (Manual IV) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Flauto Mirabilis
61
8
  Orchestral Oboe
61
8
  Gross Gamba
61
    Tremulant  
8
  Gamba Celeste
61
   
Chimes
25 tubes
4
  Orchestral Flute
61
    Solo 16'  
8
  French Horn
61
    Unison Off
8
  Flugel Horn
61
    Solo 4'
8
  English Horn
61
   
Trompette en Chamade
GAL GT
               
Chancel Bombarde Organ (Manual IV) – 61 notes, unenclosed
8
  Trompette Harmonique
61
       
4
  Clairon Harmonique
61
       

     

     
Chancel Pedal Organ – 32 notes
32
  Untersatz [ext.]
12
4
  Nachthorn
32
16
  Prinzipal
32
2
  Blockflöte
32
16
  Holzflötenbass
32
64
  Grosskornet VII ranks
224
16
  Subbass
32
16
  Sesquialtera II ranks
64
16
  Gedeckt
32
    Mixtur IV ranks
128
16
  Violone
GT
    Scharf V ranks
160
16
  Dulciana
CH
32
  Bombarde [ext.]
12
16
  Quintade
GT
32
  Kontra Posaune [ext.]
12
16
  Flûte Conique
SW
32
  Kontra Fagott [ext.]
12
10 2/3
  Grossquinte
32
16
  Posaune
32
8
  Prinzipal
32
16
  Fagott
32
8
  Pommer Gedeckt
32
8
  Trompete
32
8
  Gemshorn
32
4
  Klarine
32
4
  Oktav
32
2
  Schalmei
32

     

     
CELESTIAL ORGAN

     

     
Celestial Organ (Manual V) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Harmonic Flute
73
8
  Cor de Gabriel
73
8
  Flûte d'amour
73
8
  Trompette harmonique
73
8
  Erzähler
73
8
  Vox Humana
73
8
  Klein Erzähler [TC]
61
4
  Clairon
73
8
  Echo Dulcet II ranks
146
    Tremulant  
4
  Octave
73
    Celestial 16'  
4
  Flute
73
    Unison Off  

  Grande Fourniture VII ranks
427
    Celestial 4'
16
  Bombarde
73
   
Zymbelstern
8 bells
16
  Corno di Bassetto
73
    Carillon  

     

     
Celestial Pedal Organ – 32 notes, enclosed
16
  Diapason [unit]
44
8
  Octave
16
  Dulciana
32
16
  Ophicleide
32

     

     
GALLERY ORGAN

     

     
Gallery Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes
16
  Quintaton
61
2
  Super Octave
61
8
  Principal
61
2
  Blockflöte
61
8
  Gedeckt
61
    Fourniture IV ranks
244
8
  Spitzflöte
61
    Cymbel III ranks
183
4
  Octave
61
    Unison Off  
4
  Rohrflöte
61
8
  Trompette en Chamade
61
2 2/3
  Quinte
61
       

     

     
Gallery Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Gemshorn
73
    Plein Jeu III ranks
183
8
  Geigen Diapason
73
    Cymbel III ranks
183
8
  Stopped Diapason
73
16
  Bombarde
73
8
  Viole de Gambe
73
8
  Trumpet
73
8
  Viole Celeste
73
8
  Trompette
73
4
  Octave
73
4
  Clairon
73
4
  Flute
73
    Tremulant  
2 2/3
  Nazard
61
    Gallery Swell 16'  
2
  Super Octave
61
    Unison Off  
1 3/5
  Tierce
61
    Gallery Swell 4'  

     

     
Gallery Pedal Organ – 32 notes
32
  Open Bass
32
4
  Nachthorn
32
16
  Principal
32
2
  Blockflöte
32
16
  Bourdon
32
    Mixture III ranks
96
16
  Gemshorn
SW
    Cymbel II ranks
64
8
  Principal
32
16
  Posaune [unit]
56
8
  Gedeckt Pommer
32
8
  Trumpet
8
  Gemshorn
SW
4
  Clarion
4
  Choralbass
32
       
               
Chancel Organ of Aeolian-Skinner Organ, Op. 275-E/F (1970-71) at St. Bartholomew's Church - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
Chancel Positiv of Aeolian-Skinner Organ, Op. 275-E/F (1970-71) at St. Bartholomew's Church - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
Chancel Organ
Chancel Positiv at Upper Right
Gallery Organ of Aeolian-Skinner Organ, Op. 275-E/F (1970-71) at St. Bartholomew's Church - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
Dome Location of Celestial Division of Aeolian-Skinner Organ, Op. 275-E/F (1970-71) at St. Bartholomew's Church - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
Gallery Organ & Trompette en Chamade
Location of Celestial Organ above Dome
           
  1953 Console of Aeolian-Skinner Organ, Op. 275-E/F (1970-71) at St. Bartholomew's Church - New York City (photo: The American Organist)
 
1953 Aeolian-Skinner Console
Aeolian-Skinner Company, Inc.
Boston, Mass. – Op. 275-A (1937); 275-B (1950-53); 275-D (1967)
Electro-pneumatic key and stop action
5 manuals, 140 stops, 160 ranks




In 1937, G. Donald Harrison designed and the Aeolian-Skinner Organ Company built a new Gallery Organ (Op. 275-A) in the "classic" style—a modern conception of the type of organ which existed in the time of Bach—that included a six-stop Positiv (later removed by Harrison in 1953). All the pipework was new except for the two pedal stops which dated back to the 1872 Odell instrument. The completed scheme of the organ in 1938 consisted of 11 divisions formed from the Chancel Organ (Great, Swell, Choir, Solo and Pedal) located behind the Organ Screen in the north chancel bay, the Gallery Organ (Great, Swell, Choir/Positiv and Pedal) located behind the Organ Screen in the west end of the nave and the Celestial Organ (one manual and pedal) located within the dome. There were 133 speaking stops, 154 ranks and 8,975 pipes.

Beginning in 1950 and continuing until 1953 (Op. 275-B), the organ was modernized under the direction of Harold W. Friedell, organist and choirmaster from 1946 until his untimely death in 1958, in collaboration with Joseph S. Whiteford and the Aeolian-Skinner Company. The Chancel Great division was moved to the south chancel bay along with a new Positiv division of 6 stops, and the chancel divisions were revised with new pipework. The Gallery Choir division was discarded and its pipework distributed to various other divisions in the new scheme. In 1953, a new five-manual console was installed to control the organ that now was composed of 138 stops, 158 ranks and 9,376 pipes. Harold Friedell dedicated the organ on November 29, 1953.

In 1955, the existing Orchestral Oboe and Flugelhorn were restored to the Solo division (not shown below). About 1959, Aeolian-Skinner did some releathering and worked on the reeds (Op. 1405). Additional work was done on the reeds in 1966 (Op. 275-C). In 1967, the 61 horizontal pipes of the Trompette en Chamade were installed above the Gallery Organ case and directly below the Te Deum window in the West End of the church.
               
CHANCEL ORGAN – Opus 275-B (1950-52)
               
Chancel Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
16
  Quintade
61
4
  Principal
61
8
  Diapason
61
4
  Flute Traverso
61
8
  Principal
61
2 2/3
  Quint
61
8
  Holzflöte
61
2
  Fifteenth
61
8
  Viola da Gamba
61
 
  Fourniture IV ranks
244
4
  Octave
61
    Cymbale III ranks
183

     

     
Chancel Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon
68
    Plein Jeu V ranks
305
8
  Diapason
68
    Cornet III ranks
183
8
  Geigen
68
16
  Contre Trompette
68
8
  Gemshorn
68
8
  Trompette
68
8
  Rohrflöte
68
8
  Cornopean
68
8
  Spitzflöte
68
8
  Oboe
68
8
  Flute Celeste
68
4
  Clairon
68
8
  Aeoline
68
    Tremulant  
8
  Salicional
68
    Harp
CH
8
  Vox Celeste
68
    Swell 16'
4
  Octave Geigen
68
    Unison Off
4
  Flute Harmonique
68
    Swell 4'
2
  Octavin
68
       

     

     
Chancel Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Dulciana
68
8
  Cromorne
68
8
  Viola Pomposa
68
4
  Clarion
68
8
  Viola Celeste
68
  Tremulant  
8
  Concert Flute
68
   
Chimes
SO
4
  Prestant
68
   
Harp
49 bars
4
  Waldflöte
68
    Sub Celesta [TC]
2 2/3
  Nazard
68
    Choir 16'  
2
  Piccolo
68
    Unison Off  
8
  Clarinet
68
    Choir 4'  
               
Chancel Positiv Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes
8
  Nason Flute
61
1 3/5
  Terz
61
4
  Koppel Flute
61
1 1/3
  Larigot
61
2
  Prinzipal
61
    Zymbel III ranks
183

     

     
Chancel Solo Organ (Manual IV) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Diapason
68
8
  English Horn
68
8
  Flauto Mirabilis
68
8
  Tuba Mirabilis
68
8
  Gross Geigen
68
    Tremulant  
8
  Gamba Celeste
68
   
Chimes
25 tubes
4
  Octave
68
    Solo 16'  
4
  Philomela
68
    Unison Off  
8
  French Horn
68
    Solo 4'  

     

     
Chancel Pedal Organ – 32 notes
32
  Bourdon [unit]
56
5 1/3
  Quint
32
16
  Flute Ouverte
32
4
  Choral Bass
32
16
  Contre Basse
32
4
  Spitzprincipal
32
16
  Violone [unit]
44
2
  Blockflöte
32
16
  Bourdon
    Fourniture IV ranks
128
16
  Quintade
GT
32
  Bombarde [unit]
68
16
  Lieblich Gedeckt
SW
32
  Fagotto [unit]
44
16
  Dulciana
CH
16
  Trombone
8
  Principal
32
16
  Fagotto
8
  Flute
8
  Trumpet
8
  Cello
4
  Clarion

     

     
CELESTIAL ORGAN – Opus 832 (1930); revised

     

     
Celestial Organ (Manual V) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Harmonic Flute
73
8
  Tuba Mirabilis
73
8
  Flute d'Amour
73
8
  Trompette harmonique
73
8
  Erzähler
73
8
  Vox Humana
73
8
  Kleine Erzähler [TC] *
61
4
  Clairon
73
8
  Echo Dulcet II ranks
146
    Tremulant  
4
  Octave
73
    Celestial 16'  
4
  Flute
73
    Unison Off  

  Grande Fourniture VII ranks
427
    Celestial 4'
16
  Bombarde
73
   
Zymbelstern
8 bells
16
  Corno di Bassetto
73
   
* replaced 8' Stentorphone (1953)

     

     
Celestial Pedal Organ – 32 notes, enclosed
16
  Diapason [unit]
44
8
  Octave
16
  Dulciana
32
16
  Ophicleide
32

     

     
GALLERY ORGAN – Opus 275-A (1937)

     

     
Gallery Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes
16
  Quintaton
61
2
  Super Octave
61
8
  Principal
61
2
  Block Flute
61
8
  Gedeckt
61
    Fourniture IV ranks
244
8
  Spitzflöte
61
    Cymbel III ranks
183
4
  Octave
61
16
 
Fagot
preparation
4
  Rohrflöte
61
8
 
Trumpet
preparation
2 2/3
  Quinte
61
8
  Trompette en Chamade (1967)
61

     

     
Gallery Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Gemshorn
73
    Cymbel III ranks
183
8
  Geigen
73
16
  Bombarde
73
8
  Gedeckt
73
8
  Trumpet
73
8
  Viole de Gambe
73
8
  Trompette
73
8
  Viole Celeste
73
4
  Clairon
73
4
  Octave
73
    Tremulant  
4
  Flute
73
    Swell 16'  
2 2/3
  Nazard
61
    Unison Off  
2
  Super Octave
61
    Swell 4'  
    Plein Jeu III ranks
183
       

     

     
Gallery Pedal Organ – 32 notes
32
  Open Bass
32
4
  Nachthorn
32
16
  Principal
32
2
  Blockflöte
32
16
  Bourdon
32
    Mixture III ranks
96
16
  Gemshorn
SW
    Cymbel II ranks
64
8
  Principal
32
16
  Posaune [unit]
56
8
  Gedeckt Pommer
32
8
  Trumpet
8
  Gemshorn
SW
4
  Clarion
4
  Choralbass
32
       
               
Couplers
    Bottom Row   Top Row
    Chan. Great to Pedal 8'   Gal. Great to Pedal 8'
    Chan. Swell to Pedal 8', 4'   Gal. Swell to Pedal 8', 4'
    Choir to Pedal 8', 4'   Gal. Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'
    Solo to Pedal 8', 4'   Gal. Swell to Solo 8'
    Positiv to Pedal 8'   Gal. Great to Solo 8'
    Chan. Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'   Celestial to Pedal 8', 4'
    Choir to Great 16', 8', 4'   Celestial to Swell 8'
    Solo to Great 16', 8', 4'   Celestial to Great 8'
    Positiv to Great 16', 8'   Celestial to Choir 8'
    Chanc. Swell to Choir 16', 8', 4'   Celestial to Solo 8'
    Solo to Choir 8'    
    Swell to Solo 8'    
    Great to Solo 8'    
               
Adjustable Combinations
   
Chancel Great Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8 & 0 (thumb)
Chancel Swell Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8 & 0 (thumb)
Choir Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8 & 0 (thumb)
Solo Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 & 0 (thumb)
Positiv Pistons 1-2-3-4 (thumb)
Chancel Pedal Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8 (thumb)
Chancel General Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10 (thumb & toe)
Celestial Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 & 0 (thumb)
Gallery Great Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb)
Gallery Swell Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb)
Gallery Pedal Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (to3)
Gallery General Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb & toe)
Couplers Pistons 1-2-3-4 & 0 (thumb)
Masters Pistons I-II-III-IV-V (thumb & toe) – brings on corres. Chan. & Gal. generals
Chancel Cancel Chancel Cancel (thumb)
Gallery Cancel Gallery Cancel (thumb)
               
Reversibles & Accessories
    Chancel Great to Pedal (thumb & toe)   All Swells to Swell (thumb)
    Gallery Great to Pedal (thumb)   Pedal Divide (thumb)
    Chancel Swell to Pedal (thumb & toe)   Pedal on Combs. (thumb)
    Gallery Swell to Pedal (thumb)   Full Organ (thumb & toe)
    Choir to Pedal (thumb & toe)   Chancel Organs On / Off (keycheek)
    Positiv to Pedal (thumb & toe)   Gallery Organs On / Off (keycheek)
    Solo to Pedal (thumb & toe)   Great on Celestial
    Celestial to Pedal (thumb & toe)   Choir – Both – Positiv (keycheek)
    Celestial to Great (thumb)   Chancel Organs Off (keycheek)
    Celestial to Swell (thumb)   Gallery Organs Off (keycheek)
    Celestial to Choir (thumb)   Mixtures Off (keycheek)
    Celestial to Solo (thumb)   Chorus Reeds Off (keycheek)
    32' Open Wood (toe)   16' Manual Stops Off (keycheek)
    32' Untersatz (toe)    
    32' Bombarde (toe)    
               
Pedal Movements
    Balanced Celestial Pedal   Balanced Gallery Swell Pedal
    Balanced Choir Pedal   Gallery Crescendo
    Balanced Chancel Swell Pedal   Chancel Crescendo
    Balanced Solo Pedal    
           
  Installation of Skinner Organ Company Celestial Organ, Op. 832 (1930) in St. Bartholomew's Church - New York City
  Installing the Celestial Organ in the Dome
Skinner Organ Company
Boston, Mass. – Opus 832 (1930)
Celestial Organ
18 stops, 24 ranks



When the dome above the crossing in the Nave was completed in 1930, the Skinner Organ Company installed the Celestial Organ (Op. 832). This organ, with its battery of brilliant reed stops and soft, ethereal stops, was given by Emily Vanderbilt White as a memorial to her son, Malcolm Douglas Sloane.

An article in The Diapason (January 1931) described the installation:
     This new department consists of a diapason and reed chorus with an echo section and an independent pedal organ, voiced on pressues varying from 6 to 25 inches. The chest and pipes are situated in the top of the dome above the ornamental screen, sixty-six feet above the level of the church floor, and occupy one half of the space available. The other half is covered with hard plaster and forms an enormous resonance chamber. This resonance chamber has greatly improved the general acoustics of the church, which were inclined to be dead, and at the same time gives life and vigor to the powerful stops of the new section and a delightful mystery to the softer voices.
     The full power of the celestial organ is just sufficient to form a fitting climax to the chancel and west end organs and, being situated about midway between the two, binds them together. The wonderful acoustics of the dome enable the sound waves from the celestial organ to flood the church so that it is difficult for the listener to locate the position of this section, with the result that it is possible to play a solo on one of the stops of the celestial organ and accompany it on the chancel organ, or vice versa, without the listener being conscious of the fact that the two sections are widely separated.

     

     
Celestial Organ (Manual V) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Stentorphone
73
8
  Tuba Mirabilis
73
8
  Flute Harmonic
73
8
  Trompette harmonique
73
8
  Echo Dulcet II ranks
146
8
  Vox Humana
73
8
  Erzähler
73
4
  Clairon
73
8
  Flute d'amour
73
    Tremulant  
4
  Octave
73
    Celestial 16'  
4
  Flute
73
    Unison Off  

  Grande Fourniture VII ranks
427
    Celestial 4'
16
  Bombarde
73
   
Zymbelstern  
16
  Corno di Bassetto
73
       

     

     
Celestial Pedal Organ – 32 notes, enclosed
16
  Diapason [unit]
44
8
  Octave
16
  Dulciana
32
16
  Ophicleide
32
           
  Enlarged Console (Op. 651, 1927) of Ernest Skinner Company Organ, Op. 275 (1917) in St. Bartholomew's Church - New York City
Skinner Organ Company
Boston, Mass. – Opus 651 (1927)
Console enlargement to 5 manuals





It was David McK. Williams, organist and choirmaster from 1920 until 1946, who conceived the grand design for the tonal scheme and placement of the various divisions of the present-day instrument. In collaboration with Ernest M. Skinner, the Gallery Solo division was moved to the chancel in 1927, and additional pipes were incorporated into the Chancel Organ. A fifth manual was fitted into the console shell in preparation for the addition of a Dome division (Op. 832 in 1930).

 
When the Aeolian-Skinner Company installed a new console in 1953, the added fifth manual of the old console was removed for use in company installations. This keyboard was subsequently acquired by Anthony Bufano, organ curator, who fashioned the manual into a tuning keyboard in the dome of St. Bartholomew's.
             
  E.M. Skinner Organ, Op. 275 (1917) at St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church - New York City (Lynnwood Farnam; courtesy The Curtis Institute of Music)
Ernest M. Skinner Company
Boston, Mass. – Opus 275 (1917)
Electro-pneumatic action
4 manuals, 117 stops, 115 ranks, 7,587 pipes





The original organ in the present church was installed in the chancel and west gallery in 1918 by Ernest M. Skinner of Boston. Skinner's Op. 275 incorporated many ranks from instruments in the previous church by George S. Hutchings of Boston (1893, Opus 402) and by J.H. and C.S. Odell of New York City (1872, Opus 112). As Skinner had been closely associated in the building of the earlier Hutchings organ, his organ for St. Bartholomew's used a new type of mechanism with electro-pneumatic Pitman chests that had been perfected by Skinner. This new mechanism allowed a total of nine divisions to be installed in the chancel and gallery, all controlled by electric action from a movable four-manual console in the chancel. In 1920, a set of Chimes was added as a memorial to Arthur S. Hyde, organist and choirmaster of the Church from 1908 until his death in 1920.

The photo of the Skinner console is from one of the "Organ Notebooks" kept by Lynnwood Farnam, a noted concert organist of the early 20th century.
               
CHANCEL ORGAN
               
Chancel Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
16
  Diapason
61
4
  Octave
61
8
  First Diapason
61
4
  Flute Traverso
61
8
  Second Diapason
61
2 2/3
  Quint
61
8
  Doppelflote
61
2
  Fifteenth
61
8
  Concert Flute
61
 
  Mixture IV ranks
244
8
  Gamba
61
8
  Trumpet
61

     

     
Chancel Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon
73
4
  Flute Harmonique
73
8
  Diapason
73
2
  Piccolo
61
8
  Stopped Diapason
73
 
  Mixture V ranks
305
8
  Gemshorn
73
16
  Contra Fagotto
73
8
  Quintadena
73
 8
  Cornopean
73
8
  Salicional
73
8
  Oboe
73
8
  Voix Celestes
73
8
  Vox Humana
73
8
  Aeoline
73
4
  Clarion
73
4
  Octave
73
    Tremolo  
4
  Salicet
73
 
   

     

     
Chancel Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Dulciana
73
4
  Gemshorn
73
8
  Geigen Principal
73
2
  Piccolo
61
8
  Diapason
73
8
  Clarinet
73
8
  Gedeckt
73
8
  Orchestral Oboe
73
8
  Clarabella
73
    Tremolo  
8
  Dulciana
73
   
Celesta
61 bars
4
  Wald Flute
73
    Celesta Sub

     

     
Chancel Pedal Organ – 32 notes
16
  Diapason [unit]
44
8
  Flute
16
  Bourdon [unit]
44
8
  Cello
16
  Violone [unit]
44
16
  Trombone [unit]
44
10 2/3
  Quint
8
  Tromba
8
  Octave
 
     

     

     
GALLERY ORGAN

     

     
Gallery Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
16
  Diapason
61
4
  Flute Harmonique
61
8
  Diapason
61
2 2/3
  Twelfth
61
8
  Violin Diapason
61
2
  Fifteenth
61
8
  Horn Diapason
61
 
  Mixture IV ranks
244
8
  Melodia
61
 
  Mixture V ranks
305
8
  Rohr Flute
61
16
  Ophicleide [unit]
85
8
  Gamba
61
8
  Trumpet
4
  Octave
61
4
  Clarion
4
  Fugara
61
       

     

     
Gallery Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon
73
4
  Octave
73
8
  Diapason [large]
73
4
  Flute d'Amour
73
8
  Diapason
73
2
  Flautino
61
8
  Stopped Diapason
73
    Dolce Cornet V ranks
305
8
  Gross Flute
73
16
  Posaune
73
8
  Spitz Flute
73
8
  Trumpet Harmonique
73
8
  Salicional
73
8
  Cor Anglais
73
8
  Voix Celestes
73
8
  Vox Humana
73
8
  Dolce
73
4
  Clarion
73
8
  Unda Maris [TC]
61
    Tremolo  
               
Gallery Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Diapason
73
4
  Octave
73
8
  Clarabella
73
4
  Flute [wood]
73
8
  Keraulophon
73
2
  Piccolo
61
8
  Gedeckt
73
    Mixture III ranks
183
8
  Dulciana
73
8
  Flugel Horn
73

     

     
Gallery Solo Organ (Manual IV) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Stentorphone
73
8
  Philomela
PED
8
  Grossflote
73
8
  Tuba Mirabilis
73
8
  Doppelflote
73
8
  French Horn
73
8
  Gross Gamba
73
8
  English Horn
73
8
  Gamba Celeste
73
   
Chimes (1920)
25 tubes
               
Gallery Pedal Organ – 32 notes
32
  Diapason
32
8
  Gedeckt
16
  Diapason [unit]
56
8
  Violoncello
16
  Contra Bass [unit]
44
8
  Still Gedeckt
SW
16
  Bourdon [unit]
44
4
  Super Octave
16
  Lieblich Gedeckt
SW
32
  Bombarde [ext., in Chancel]
12
10 2/3
  Quint
16
  Trombone
32
8
  Octave
8
  Posaune
SW
               
Couplers (tablets above top manual)
    Chancel   Gallery
    Swell to Pedal   Swell to Pedal
    Great to Pedal   Great to Pedal
    Choir to Pedal   Choir to Pedal
    Swell to Great   Solo to Pedal
    Choir to Great   Pedal 4
    Swell to Choir   Swell to Great
    Swell to Solo   Choir to Great
    Great to Solo   Solo to Great
    Swell 16   Swell to Choir
    Swell 4   Swell to Solo
    Swell to Great 16   Great to Solo
    Swell to Great 4   Solo to Choir
    Choir 16   Swell 16
    Choir 4   Swell 4
        Swell to Great 16
            Swell to Great 4  
            Choir 16  
            Choir 4  
            Solo 16  
            Solo 4  
            Solo to Great 16  
            Solo to Great 4  
             
M.P. Möller, Inc.
Hagerstown, Md. – Opus 2424 (1917)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 39 registers, 21 stops, 15 ranks



A contract dated June 29, 1917, states that the M.P. Möller Company agreed to build a three-manual organ for the sum of $4,400. Möller allowed a credit of $2,000 for "unused salvage from the old Chapel organ," and "parts of the old organ adaptable for use in the new instrument." The organ was shipped on August 24, 1918. On October 15, 1918, Bertram Goodhue, the architect, wrote a letter to the Rev. Leighton Parks, the rector, stating that "the Moller Organ Company has promised to have the instrument ready for the opening of the church, on October 20."

Research to date has not determined exactly where in the church the Möller organ was setup. Following the completion of the Skinner organ in the church, this Möller organ may have been moved to the Chapel, prior to the installation of the 1925 Casavant organ, or to the adjacent 1918 Parish House.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
8
  Open Diapason
73
8
  Dulciana
73
8
  Concert Flute
CH
4
  Octave [from Open Diap.]
8
  Doppel Flöte
73
8
  Tuba Minor
73

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Open Diapason
73
8
  Aeoline
73
8
  Salicional
73
4
  Violina
73
8
  Vox Celeste [TC]
61
8
  Oboe
73
8
  Stopped Diapason
73
    Tremulant  

     

     
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Concert Flute
73
8
  Tuba Minor
GT
8
  Dulciana
GT
8
  Vox Humana
61
4
  Flute d'Amour
73
    Tremulant  
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
16
  Bourdon [unit]
44
8
  Bass Flute
16
  Bourdon Dolce [lo-press.]
       
               
Couplers
    Great to Pedal 8'   Swell to Choir 8'
    Swell to Pedal 8'   Great to Great 4'
    Choir to Pedal 8'   Swell to Swell 16', 4'
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'   Choir to Choir 16', 4'
    Choir to Great 16', 8', 4'    
               
Mechanicals
    Swell Tremulant   Wind Indicator
    Choir Tremulant   Crescendo Indicator
               
Adjustable Combinations
    Pistons No. 1-2-3-4 affecting Great stops  
    Pistons No. 1-2-3-4 affecting Choir stops  
    Pistons No. 1-2-3-4 affecting Swell stops  
    Pistons No. 1-2-3 affecting Full Organ  
               
Pedal Movements
    Great to Pedal Reversible   Balanced Choir Expression Pedal
    Balanced Swell Expression Pedal   Grand Crescendo Pedal
             
  Hutchings Organ, Op. 402 (1893) at St. Bartholomew's Episcopal Church - New York City (St. Bartholomew Church Archives)
Organ in church located at 343 Madison Avenue at 44th Street:

George S. Hutchings

Boston, Mass. – Opus 402 (1893)
Tubular-electric action
4 manuals, 125 registers, 87 stops, 100 ranks




In 1893, the George S. Hutchings Company was contracted to install a new Chancel Organ (Op. 328) in two chambers, one on each side of the chancel. Hutchings also rebuilt (as Op. 329) the 1872 Odell organ in the gallery, and (as Op. 402) electrically combined the two organs so that both organs could be played from a movable four-manual "bat-wing" style console in the chancel. Ernest M. Skinner, then an employee of Hutchings, designed the electric action which incorporated pitman windchests. This new action proved to be unreliable, at first so unsatisfactory that Dr. Greer, the rector, remarked that "its behavior is sometimes little short of blasphemous." The electrical problems were resolved two years later with the use of a different type of magnet.

Noted concert organist Edwin H. Lemare made his American debut on this much-acclaimed organ on New Year's Day in 1901 and, in 1905, conductor Leopold Stowkowski came from England to become organist and choirmaster of the church.
               
CHANCEL ORGAN – Opus 328 (1893)
               
Chancel Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
16
  Open Diapason
61
4
  Octave
61
8
  1st Open Diapason
61
4
  Flute Traverso
61
8
  2nd Open Diapason
61
2 2/3
  Twelfth
61
8
  Gamba
61
2
  Fifteenth
61
8
  Doppel Flute
61
 
  Mixture V ranks
305
8
  Concert Flute
61
8
  Trumpet
61

     

     
Chancel Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon
61
4
  Flute Harmonique
61
8
  Open Diapason
61
4
  Salicet
61
8
  Gemshorn
61
 2
  Piccolo
61
8
  Salicional
61
  Dolce Mixture V ranks
305
8
  Aeoline
61
16
  Fagotto
61
8
  Voix Celestis
61
8
  Cornopean
61
8
  Quintadena
61
8
  Oboe
61
8
  Stopped Diapason
61
4
  Oboe Clarion
61
4
  Octave
61
       

     

     
Chancel Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes
16
  Dulciana
61
4
  Gemshorn
61
8
  Open Diapason
61
4
  Wald Flute *
61
8
  Geigen Principal
61
2
  Piccolo Harmonique *
61
8
  Dulciana
61
8
  Clarinet *
61
8
  Clarabella
61
8
  Orchestral Oboe *
61
8
  Lieblich Gedackt *
61
   
* enclosed in separate Swell Box

     

     
Chancel Pedal Organ – 32 notes
16
  Open Diapason
32
8
  Flute
32
16
  Violone
32
8
  Violoncello
32
16
  Bourdon
32
16
  Trombone
32
10 2/3
  Quinte
32
8
  Tromba
32
8
  Octave
32
 
     

  

     

     
GALLERY ORGAN – Opus 329 (1893)

     

     
Gallery Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
16
  Open Diapason
61
2 2/3
  Twelfth
61
8
  Open Diapason
61
2
  Fifteenth
61
8
  Viola Principal
61
    Sesquialtera III ranks
183
8
  Keraulophone
61
 
  Mixture III ranks
183
8
  Rohr Flute
61
16
  Ophicleide
61
8
  Melodia
61
8
  Trumpet
61
4
  Octave
61
4
  Clarion
61
4
  Harmonic Flute
61
       

     

     
Gallery Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon Treble [TC]
49
4
  Octave
61
16
  Bourdon Bass
12
4
  Flageolet
61
8
  Open Diapason
61
    Cornet III ranks
183
8
  Salicional
61
8
  Cornopean
61
8
  Dolce
61
8
  Saxophone
61
8
  Stopped Diapason
61
8
  Vox Humana *
61
4
  Flute d'Amour
61
   
* stop labeled "Caruso"
               
Gallery Solo Organ (Manual IV) – 61 notes
8
  Open Diapason
61
8
  Hohl Flute
61
8
  Gross Flute
61
8
  Tuba Mirabilis
61
               
Gallery Pedal Organ – 32 notes
32
  Contra Bourdon
32
16
  Bourdon
32
16
  Open Diapason
32
8
  Violoncello
32
16
  Contra Bass
32
16
  Bombarde
32
             
Organ in the second church, located at 343 Madison Avenue at 44th Street:

J.H. & C.S. Odell
New York City – Opus 112 (1872)
Mechanical and tubular-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 42 stops, 46 ranks



The original organ in the second St. Bartholomew's Church, located on Madison Avenue and 44th Street, was built by the J.H. & C.S. Odell Company of New York City. A handwritten contract and specification, signed on the 8th day of February, 1872, stated that the organ would be in perfect and complete order by August 1, 1872. At a cost of $9,500, the organ would have a five-year guarantee, and would kept in repair and tune for one year from the day of completion. Just one month earlier, on January 16, 1871, John H. Odell was granted the first American patent for a tubular-pneumatic key action, and Odell used this new application on the bass octave of the organ for St. Bartholomew's. The Odells provided generous mechanical devices to aid in registration, including eight pneumatic combination pistons—arranged from loud to soft—for each manual, plus four reversibles, and three "Double Acting Patent Pneumatic Composition Pedals", which were also reversible.

The Odell Organ for St. Bartholomew's was heard in a "Grand Exhibition" concert for the public on May 22, 1873, performed by organists S. J. Gilbert, Charles Edward Horsley (St. John's Chapel, Trinity Parish), Henry Eyre Browne (Brooklyn Tabernacle), and Samuel P. Warren (Grace Church). Mr. Charles Dodge, Organist of the church, was the Musical Director.
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 58 notes
16
  Grand Double Open Diapason
58
4
  Harmonic Flute
58
8
  Open Diapason
58
3
  Twelfth
58
8
  Gamba ["brilliant & full"]
58
2
  Fifteenth
58
8
  Keraulophon ["loud & crisp"]
58
    Sesquialtera, 3 ranks
174
8
  Melodia [wood]
58
    Mixture, 3 ranks
174
8
  Clarionet Flute
58
8
  Trumpet
58
4
  Principal
58
4
  Clarion
58

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 58 notes, enclosed
16
 
Double Diapason
}
46
4
  Flute à Cheminée
58
16
 
Bourdon Bass
}
12
2
  Fifteenth
58
8
  Open Diapason
58
    Cornet, 3 ranks
174
8
  Salicional
58
8
  Cornopean
58
8
  Dulciana
58
8
  Hautbois
58
8
  Stop'd Diapason
58
8
  Vox Humana
58
4
  Octave
58
    Tremulant  

     

     
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 58 notes
8
  Open Diapason
58
4
  Wald Flute
58
8
  Dulciana
58
2
  Flageolet
58
8
  Keraulophon
58
8
 
Clarionet [TC]
}
46
8
  Clarabella
58
8
 
Bassoon Bass
}
12
4
  Violina
58
    Tremulant  

     

     
Pedal Organ – 27 notes
32
  Grand Double Open Diapason
27
16
  Contra Gamba
27
16
  Grand Double Open Diapason
27
8
  Violoncello
27
16
  Grand Bourdon
27
16
  Trombone
27
               
Couplers
    Choir to Great       Reversible Coupler Knobs
    Pedals to Swell       Swell to Great  
    Pedals to Choir       Swell to Choir  
    Pedals at Octaves       Great to Pedals  
    Bellows          
               
Composition Pedals
    1. Pedal Bourdon
    2. All the Pedal Stops except Trombone
    3. Full Organ, Reversable [sic] back to 8 feet Stops in Great
    4. Grand Crescendo & Diminuendo Pedal, incl. Great, Swell & Choir Organs & Pedals
               
Patent Pneumatic Compositions
    Great Organ
    1. Full Organ
    2. Full to Mixture
    3. Full to Principal except Double Open
    4. All the 8 foot Stops except Trumpet
    5. Clarionet Flute & Keraulophon
    6. Open Diapason & Trumpet
    7. Open Diapason
    8. Harmonic Flute or Melodia? [sic]
               
    Choir Organ
    1. Full Choir except Tremulant
    2. Open Diapason, Dulciana, Keraulophon, Clarabella, Violina, Wald Flute
    3. Open Diapason and Keraulophon
    4. Dulciana, Keraulophon, Wald Flute
    5. Clarabella and Wald Flute
    6. Clarionet and Bassoon Bass
    7. Clarabella
    8. Wald Flute
     
    Swell Organ
    1. Full Swell
    2. Full to Cornet, inclusive
    3. Open Diapason, Salicional, Dulciana, St. Diapason, Octave, Flute, Fifteenth, Cornet
    4. Open Diapason, Salicional, Dulciana, St. Diapason, Flute
    5. Stop'd Diapason and Flute à Cheminée
    6. Dulciana and Flute à Cheminée
    7. Salicional
    8. Flute à Cheminée and Vox Humana
               
Miscellaneous
    "The character of each Pneumatic Knob to be designed on a neatly engraved Ivory or metal Tablet over each Knob where desired. The entire organ to be made of the best materials & workmanship. The Bellows to be made of ample size & double leathered throughout, with inverted ribs & counterbalances. All of the Pedals and key action to be bushed. The two upper sets of Keys to overhang & all to have oval pins regulating screws to raise and lower the depth of touch. The bellows handle to have antifriction centres. The Bellows wind chest & all his chambers to be varnished with shelac [sic]. The Swell box to be of double thickness, well lined with air chambers between the two thicknesess [sic] & to have three full sets of equilibrium shades worked by a balance pedal."
             
Organ in the first St. Bartholomew's Church, located at Lafayette Place and Great Jones Street:

Henry Erben
New York City (1839)
Mechanical action
2 manuals, 24 stops, 1½ octaves pedals



In 1837, the vestry of St. Bartholomew's Church arranged for an organ to be installed in the new building, which was being built on the corner of Lafayette Place and Great Jones Street. Henry Erben of New York City was contracted to build an organ at a cost of $3,000. At the same time, a bell for the steeple was ordered, costing $1,250.

The American Musical Directory of 1861 stated that the organ had "2 banks keys, 24 stops, 1½ octaves pedals." Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
             
Sources:
     Aeolian-Skinner Archives web site: http://aeolian-skinner.110mb.com/
     Aeolian-Skinner Organ Company, Inc. Booklet describing the organ in St. Bartholomew's Church (c.1953). Courtesy Neal Campbell.
     American Musical Directory. New York: Thomas Hutchinson, 1861.
     The American Organist (Jan. 1954):17-18. Specifications of Aeolian-Skinner Organ, Op. 275-B (1950-52).
     American Organ Archives of the Organ Historical Society, Princeton, N.J. Contract and Specifications of M.P. Möller Organ, Op. 2424 (1917). Courtesy Jonathan Bowen.
     Blanton, Joseph E. The Organ in Church Design. Albany: Venture Press, 1957.
     Boston Organ Club. M.P. Möller, Inc. Opus List. Courtesy Larry Trupiano.
     The Church Music Review (unknown year): 503-4. Courtesy Jonathan Bowen.
     "Dedication of the Organ and Evensong." Leafet (Oct. 31, 1971). St. Bartholomew's Church, New York City. Courtesy Neal Campell.
     Dolkart, Andrew S. and Matthew A. Postal. Guide to New York City Landmarks (Third Edition). New York City Landmarks Preservation Commission. Hoboken: John Wiley & Sons, Inc. 2004.
     Dunlap, David. From Abyssinian to Zion: A Guide to Manhattan's Houses of Worship. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004.
     The Episcopal Diocese of New York Archives; Wayne Kempen, Archivist.
     Holden, Dorothy. The Life and Work of Ernest M. Skinner. Richmond: The Organ Historical Society, 1987.
     Hunt, Douglass. History of the organs at St. Bartholomew's Church.
     Kinzey, Allen, and Sand Lawn, comps. E.M. Skinner/Aeolian-Skinner Opus List. New Rev. Ed. Richmond: The Organ Historical Society, 1997.
     Nelson, George. Organs in the United States and Canada Database. Seattle, Wash.
     Ochse, Orpha. "A Glimpse of the 1860s," The American Organist (Nov. 1969).
     Ogasapian, John. Organ Building in New York City: 1700-1900. Braintree, Mass.: The Organ Literature Foundation, 1977.
     The Organ ( Vol. 2, No. 7, Nov. 1893). Specifications of George S. Hutchings Organ, Op. 402 (1893). Courtesy Sand Lawn.
     "St. Bartholomew's Church – Opening for the Inspection of the Public," The New York Times (Nov. 1, 1872).
     "St. Bartholomew's Marks 100th Year," The New York Times (Jan. 6, 1935).
     "St. Bartholomew's To Be Rededicated," The New York Times (Dec. 7, 1930).
     St. Bartholomew's Church web site: http://www.stbarts.org
     Smith, Christine. St. Bartholomew's Church in the City of New York. New York: Oxford University Press, 1988.
     Smith, Rollin. Stokowski and the Organ. Hillsdale: Pendragon Press, 2004.
     Trupiano, Larry. Factory Specifications of J.H. & C.S. Odell Organ, Op. 112 (1872).
     Trupiano, Larry. Factory Specifications of M.P. Möller Organ, Op. 2424 (1917).

Illustrations:
     Callahan, Charles. Unknown installer holding pipe in dome.
     Campbell, Neal. Tuning keyboard in dome.
     Farnam, Lynnwood. Console of Skinner organ, Op. 275 (1917). "Lynnwood Farnam Collection," John de Lancie Library, The Curtis Institute of Music, Philadelphia; Sally Branca, archivist. Courtesy Jonathan Bowen.
     Lawson, Steven E. Aeolian-Skinner Organ, Op. 275-E/F (1970-71); Harris console (2006); church interior.
     Martin, Tim. Harris console (2006) in concert position.
     St. Bartholomew's Church Archives. George S. Hutchings Organ, Op. 402 (1893) and console; 1916 proposal by Bertram Grosvenor Goodhue.
     St. Bartholomew's Church Year Book, 1897. Exterior of Parish House. Courtesy Episcopal Diocese of New York Archives.
     Smith, Christine. St. Bartholomew's Church in the City of New York. Drawing of St. Bartholomew's Church on Lafayette Place.
     Underhill, Irving (1918). Photo of St. Barthomew's Church on Madison Avenue. Library of Congress Prints & Photographs Online.