St. Elizabeth of Hungary Catholic Church - New York City
 
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Church of St. Elizabeth of Hungary
Roman Catholic)

211 East 83rd Street
New York, N.Y. 10028
http://www.stelizabethofhungarynyc.org/

Organ Specifications:
211 East 83rd Street (since 1917)
II/13 Kilgen Organ Company, Op. 7677 (1953)
• L.C. Harrison (c.1917)
345 East 4th Street (1892-1917) – "Slov. Kostol Sv. Alzbety"
II/8 M.P. Möller, Op. 1444 (1912)
• Unknown Builder



 




The parish of St. Elizabeth of Hungary (Slovensky Kostol Sv. Alzbety), founded in 1891, was the first national Slovak parish for the Slovak and Hungarian Catholics of New York City and Brooklyn. On April 26, 1891 the first Mass was celebrated in the basement of St. Bridget's Church on 8th Street and Avenue B, and the parish was formally incorporated on November 25, 1891. The first church was built at 345 East 4th Street, and the first Mass in the new building was celebrated on August 7, 1892. This building was extant in 2012 as San Isidoro y San Leandro Orthodox Catholic Church of the Hispanic Rite. Several other churches were formed from St. Elizabeth of Hungary: St. John Nepomucene (1895, Slovak) and St. Stephen of Hungary (1901, Hungarian) in New York City, and Holy Family (1903, Slovak) in Brooklyn.

In 1917, St. Elizabeth of Hungary moved uptown to its present location after acquiring the former Second Immanuel Lutheran Church, a neo-Gothic church built in 1893 and altered by Francis J. Berlenbach.

In 1980, Cardinal Terence Cooke designated the church the official home for deaf Catholics at the request of Monsignor McCahill, who had been looking for a base for them. It became a favorite of Cardinal Cooke's successor, Cardinal John O'Connor, who spoke of it fondly and came once a year to celebrate Mass.

Today the church is Hungarian in name only.
 
  George Kilgen Organ, Op. 7677 (1953) at St. Elizabeth of Hungary Catholic Church - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
Kilgen Organ Company
St. Louis, Mo. – Opus 7677 (1953)
Electro-pneumatic action
2 manuals, 20 registers, 13 stops, 13 ranks



The organ in St. Elizabeth of Hungary Church was built in 1953 by the Kilgen Organ Company of St. Louis.
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Diapason
61
2 2/3
  Twelfth
61
8
  Hohl Flute
61
2
  Fifteenth
61
8
  Dulciana
61
    Grave Mixture II rks [draws 2-2/3 + 2]
4
  Principal
61
   
Chimes
preparation

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Geigen Diapason
73
4
  Flute Harmonic
73
8
  Rohr Floete
73
8
  Trompette
73
8
  Salicional
73
    Tremolo  
8
  Voix Celeste (TC)
61
       

     

     
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
16
  Bourdon
56
8
  Rohr Flute
SW
16
  Rohr Bourdon (ext. SW)
12
4
  Block Floete (fr. 16' Bdn)
8
  Octave [Geigen Diap.]
SW
8
  Trompette
SW
8
  Bass Flute (fr. 16' Bdn)
       
               
Couplers
    Great to Pedal 8'   Great to Great 16', Unison Off, 4'
    Swell to Pedal 8', 4'   Swell to Swell 16', Unison Off, 4'
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'    
               
Adjustable Combinations
   
Swell & Pedal Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb)
Great & Pedal Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb)
Full Organ Pistons 1-2-3-4-5 (thumb)
  General Cancellor (thumb)
  Swell Cancellor (name plate)
  Great Cancellor (name plate)
               
Pedal Movements
    Balanced Expression Pedal – Great   Great to Pedal Reversible (toe)
    Balanced Expression Pedal – Swell   Sforzando Reversible (toe)
    Crescendo Pedal    
         
L. C. Harrison
New York City (c.1917)


The files of Louis F. Mohr & Co., a longtime organ service company in the area, show that they serviced an organ built by L.C. Harrison in St. Elizabeth of Hungary Church. It may be that this organ was contemporary with the opening of the church in 1917. Specifications of this organ have not yet been located.
           
Organ in former church at 345 East 4th Street:

M.P. Möller, Inc.
Hagerstown, Md. – Opus 1444 (1912)
Tubular-pneumatic action
2 manuals, 13 registers, 8 stops, 8 ranks


The Agreement (June 21, 1912) between M.P. Möller and St. Elizabeth of Hungary Church (signed by Rev. M[athias]. A. Tamassy) states that Möller would install a two -manual organ for a consideration of $1,800, plus the present organ in the church. Möller employed tubular-pneumatic action to control eight ranks on a duplex windchest, and provided a detached two-manual console of quartered oak. The organ was to be ready for use on or before the 12th day of October.
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Open Diapason
61
4
  Flute Harmonique
61
8
  Echo Salicional
61
4
  Principal
61
8
  Stopped Diapason
61
8
  Oboe Gamba [labial]
61
               
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Echo Salicional
4
  Flute Harmonique
8
  Unda Maris (TC)
49
8
  Oboe Gamba
8
  Stopped Diapason
       
               
Pedal Organ – 30 notes
16
  Bourdon
42
       
8
  Bass Flute (fr. 16' Bdn)
       
               
Couplers
    Swell to Pedal   Swell to Great 16'
    Great to Pedal   Swell to Great 4'
    Great 4'    
               
Mechanicals
    Tremulant          
    Wind Indicator          
    Crescendo Indicator          
               
Adjustable Combinations
    Pistons No. 1-2 affecting Swell and Pedal stops
    Pistons No. 1-2 affecting Great and Pedal stops
               
Pedal Movements
    Great to Pedal Reversible    
    Balanced Swell Pedal    
    Grand Crescendo Pedal      
         
Unknown Builder


The Agreement (June 21, 1912) between M.P. Möller and St. Elizabeth of Hungary Church for a new organ states that the existing organ would be taken in trade. It is possible this was a reed organ. Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
           
Sources:
     Beszedits, Stephen. "New York City's Hungarian Churches," Vasváry Collection Newsletter (Feb. 2005).
     The Catholic Church in the United States of America: Undertaken to Celebrate the Golden Jubilee of His Holiness, Pope Pius X, Vol. III. New York: The Catholic Editing Company, 1914.
     Church of St. Elizabeth of Hungary website: http://www.stelizabethofhungarynyc.org/
     Dunlap, David W. From Abyssinian to Zion: A Guide to Manhattan's Houses of Worship. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004.
     Kloda, Barry. Specification of Geo. Kilgen & Son organ, Op. 7677 (1953).
     Mohr, Louis F. & Co. Organ list showing existence of L.C. Harrison organ. Courtesy Larry Trupiano.
     Trupiano, Larry. M.P. Möller Agreement & Specification (June 21, 1912) for M.P. Möller organ, Op. 1444.
     Trupiano, Larry. Stoplist of Geo. Kilgen & Son organ, Op. 7677 (1953).
     Wakin, Daniel J. "Praying Hands, Wringing Hands; Deaf Congregation on East Side Fears for Its Future," The New York Times (Nov. 20, 2003).

Illustrations:
     Lawson, Steven E. Exterior; interior; Kilgen organ case.