Episcopal Church of St. Ignatius of Antioch - New York City
 
Click on most images to enlarge
Church of St. Ignatius of Antioch
(Episcopal)

552 West End Avenue at 87th Street
New York, N.Y. 10024
http://www.saintignatiusnyc.org

Organ Specifications:
552 West End Avenue at 87th Street (since 1902)
III/44 Casavant Frères, Op. 2892 (1966); reb. (2011)
III/44 Casavant Frères, Op. 2892 (1966)
I/7 Flentrop Orgelbouw (1960)
II/9 Skinner Organ Company, Op. 777 (1929)
• II/29 Hook & Hastings, Op. 1321 (1886) – moved (1902)
56 West 40th Street (1872-1902)
• II/29 Hook & Hastings, Op. 1321 (1886)
• I/ Ferris & Stuart (1862)
437 Seventh Avenue (1871-1872)
• George Jardine & Son (1869)

St. Paul's Dutch Reformed Church - New York City  
St. Paul's Dutch Reformed Church
 
The Protestant Episcopal Church of St. Ignatius of Antioch was founded in December of 1871 by the Rev. Dr. Ferdinand C. Ewer during a time that marked the height of antagonism between the evangelical Low Church and the ritualistic High Church Episcopalians. Dr. Ewer left his rectorship at Christ Church following a dramatic controversy over his defiant stand for the Catholicity of the Church, the centrality of the historic episcopate, and his devotion to the Anglo-Catholic movement. In the early months of the parish, the congregation rented the former Holy Light Church (a parish for the blind) at 437 Seventh Avenue, between 33rd and 34th Streets, before renting and eventually purchasing the former St. Paul's Dutch Reformed Church, located at 54-56 West 40th Street and facing Reservoir-square (known later as Bryant Park).

By the turn of the century, the surrounding neighborhood was beginning to lose its residential character, and many parish members had moved to the recently fashionable Upper West Side. Likewise, a cruciform church in a more scholarly Gothic manner would be necessary for Father Arthur Ritchie’s increasingly elaborate liturgy carried out in due and ancient form. A site 75 by 100 feet was bought at the present location—creating the space needed for liturgical processions. Notwithstanding the stringent objections of other Episcopal churches in the area (of which there were six from 69th Street to 99th Street), Bishop Potter approved the move. Perhaps he was tired of arguing with Fr. Ritchie as he was eager to get him out of his very visible midtown location. Charles Coolidge Haight, the noted architect of collegiate and ecclesiastical buildings in New York and New Haven, and most famous for his work at the General Theological Seminary, was hired to design a new church for the parish.

  Episcopal Church of St. Ignatius of Antioch - New York City (drawing on linen by Charles C. Haight, architect)
Saint Ignatius of Antioch Church is located in a neighborhood that was developed with brownstones (single family houses) in the 1880s and with successive waves of high-rise apartment houses in the 1930s and again in the 1950s. The church building is English Gothic in character, distinguished by its stained glass windows (from Birmingham, England, ca.1925), its Roman brick interior, and its Guastavino ceiling tiles, which are interlocking and self-supporting. The church proper, which seats about 325 persons, occupies most of the building. There is a tower that houses the Sacristy, a Library/Common Room and, on the top floor, a one-bedroom apartment.
Episcopal Church of St. Ignatius of Antioch - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)  
On January 5, 1902, the first services were held in the crypt of the new church, and on October 19 of the same year, in the newly completed building upstairs. Bishop Potter expressed his disapproval of the Catholic ritual of Saint Ignatius’ Church by his absence from the formal opening, although he readily gave assent to Father Ritchie’s request to invite Bishop Charles Grafton—a distinguished Anglo-Catholic prelate—of the Diocese of Fond du Lac in Wisconsin. Unable to pay the sizeable mortgage on the new building due to unfilled hopes for funds from Father Ritchie’s will, St. Ignatius was not consecrated until February 8, 1925. Much of the existing furniture and decorations date from this period, when the slightly enriched parish hired the celebrated Boston architects Cram and Ferguson to design decoration for the chancel, nave, and Lady Chapel.
         
  Keilitz Console (2011) of Casavant Frères Organ, Op. 2892 (1966) at the Episcopal Church of St. Ignatius of Antioch - New York City (photo: Douglas Keilitz)
  Keilitz Console (2011)
Casavant Frères, Limitée
St. Hyacinthe, Québec, Canada – Opus 2892 (1966)
Rebuilt and new console by Douglas Keilitz (2011)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 32 stops, 44 ranks



The organ in St. Ignatius of Antioch was originally built in 1966 by Casavant Frères of Québec. This organ was altered slightly over the years with the addition of several stops. In September 2009, the organ suffered extensive water damage when a hot water tank in the tower apartment failed. Although the damage was covered by insurance, the congregation raised additional funds to upgrade the organ. Organbuilder Douglas Keilitz, who is also Organist and Choirmaster for the church, undertook the refurbishing of the organ. All components were cleaned and restored, and the original relay was replaced with a solid-state switching system. Keilitz also installed a rebuilt and movable three-manual drawknob console that includes preparations for future additions, and a more efficient and quieter blower. The refurbished organ was dedicated in September 2011.
               
Grand Orgue (Manual I) – 61 notes
16
 
Bourdon
preparation
4
  Flûte à bec
61
8
  Montre
61
   
Cornet III ranks
preparation
8
  Flûte à cheminée
61
1 1/3
  Fourniture IV ranks
244
8
 
Flûte harmonique
preparation
    Octave Grave
4
  Prestant
61
    Récit au Grand Orgue
4
  Flûte à fuseau
61
    Positif au Grand Orgue
               
Positif (Manual II) – 61 notes
8
 
Montre
preparation
1 3/5
  Tierce
61
8
  Bourdon
61
2/3
  Cymbale IV ranks
244
4
  Principal
61
8
  Cromorne
61
2 2/3
  Nasard
61
    Tremblant  
2
  Octave
61
    Récit au Positif
               
Récit expressif (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
 
Bourdon
preparation
16
  Basson [L/2]
61
8
 
Montre
preparation
8
  Trompette
61
8
  Bourdon
61
8
 
Hautbois
preparation
8
  Gambe
61
8
  Voix humaine
61
8
  Voix céleste [TC]
49
4
  Clairon
61
4
  Prestant
61
    Tremblant  
4
  Flûte conique
61
    Récit Grave  
2
  Doublette
61
    Récit Octave  
1 1/3
  Plein Jeu V ranks
305
    Récit Muet  
               
Ancillaire (floating) – 61 notes
8
 
Trompette-de-fête
preparation
     
    To be playable by couplers:    
    Trompette-de-fête au Grand Orgue   Trompette-de-fête au Grand Récit
    Trompette-de-fête au Positif   Trompette-de-fête au Pédale
             
Pédale – 32 notes
32
 
Contrebasse
preparation
2
  Fourniture III ranks
96
32
 
Soubasse
preparation
32
 
Bombarde
preparation
16
  Montre
32
16
  Bombarde [L/2]
32
16
  Soubasse
32
8
 
Trompette
preparation
8
  Octavebasse
32
4
  Chalumeau
32
8
  Flûte bouchée
32
    Tirasse Récit
4
  Basse du choral
32
    Tirasse Positif
4
 
Flûte
preparation
    Tirasse Grand Orgue
               
Adjustable Combinations
   
Grand Orgue Pistons 1-2-3-4 (thumb)
Positif Pistons 1-2-3-4 (thumb)
Récit expressif Pistons 1-2-3-4 (thumb)
Pédale Pistons 1-2-3-4 (thumb & toe)
General Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb & toe)
  General Cancel (thumb)
             
Reversible Pistons
    Grand Orgue au Pédale (thumb & toe)   Récit au Pédale (thumb & toe)
    Positif au Pédale (thumb & toe)   Tutti (thumb & toe)
             
Accessories
    Balanced Swell Pedal   Crescendo indicator light
    Crescendo Pedal   Full Organ indicator light
        Wind indictor light
           
  Casavant Frères Organ, Op. 2892 (1966) at the Episcopal Church of St. Ignatius of Antioch - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
Casavant Frères, Limitée
St. Hyacinthe, Québec, Canada – Opus 2892 (1966)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 33 stops, 44 ranks




In 1966, an entirely new organ was built by Casavant Frères of Québec, Canada. Casavant installed the organ in the choir gallery of the north transept, behind the Hook & Hastings case that had been modified in 1929 by the Skinner Organ Company and again by Casavant. The organ was played from a three-manual rocker-tab console located on the nave floor. The Casavant Factory Specifications (Oct. 27, 1964) show that the organ originally had 28 stops and 38 ranks. Clair Van Ausdall played the dedicatory recital on November 6, 1966.

Since its installation, the organ was slightly altered when several stops were added and others reconfigured. Following are the specifications from about 2004.
               
Grand Orgue (Manual I) – 61 notes
8
  Montre
61
4
  Flûte à fuseau
61
8
  Flûte à cheminée
61
2
  Flûte à bec
61
4
  Prestant
61
1 1/3
  Fourniture IV ranks
244
               
Positive (Manual II) – 61 notes
8
  Bourdon
61
1 3/5
  Tierce
61
4
  Principal
61
2/3
  Cymbale IV ranks +
244
2 2/3
  Nasard
61
8
  Cromorne
61
2
  Octave
61
   
+ orig. Cymbale III ranks (1/3')
               
Récit expressif (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Bourdon
61
16
  Basson [L/2]
61
8
  Gambe
61
8
  Trompette
61
8
  Voix céleste [TC] *
49
4
  Clairon *
61
4
  Prestant *
61
8
  Voix humaine *
61
4
  Flûte conique
61
    Tremulant  
2
  Doublette
61
   
° orig. Cymbale IV ranks (1-1/3')
1 1/3
  Plein Jeu V ranks °
305
       
               
Choir (console preparation only)
8
  Flûte [to be placed in choir gallery and played only through coupler to Positive]
             
Pédale – 32 notes
32
  Basse acoustique *
4
  Octave
32
16
  Montre
32
2
  Fourniture III ranks
96
16
  Soubasse
32
16
  Bombarde [L/2]
32
8
  Octave basse
32
4
  Chalumeau
32
8
  Flûte bouchée
32
       
           
* not included on original contract
Couplers
    Grand Orgue to Pédale   Positive to Grand Orgue
    Positive to Pédale   Récit to Grand Orgue
    Récit to Pédale 8', 4'   Récit to Positive
             
Combination Pistons (hold-set type)
   
Grand Orgue Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb; 5-6 dup. by toe)
Positif Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb; 5-6 dup. by toe)
Récit expressif Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb; 5-6 dup. by toe)
Pédale Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6 (thumb & toe)
General Pistons 1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10 (thumb & toe)
  General Cancel (thumb)
             
Reversible Pistons
    Récit au Pédale (thumb & toe)   Récit au Positif (thumb)
    Positif au Pédale (thumb & toe)   Récit au Grand Orgue (thumb)
    Grand Orgue au Pédale (thumb & toe)   Positif au Grand Orgue (thumb)
        Tutti (thumb & toe)
             
Accessories
    Balanced Swell Pedal   Crescendo indicator light
    Crescendo Pedal   Full Organ indicator light
        Wind indictor light
             

 
Casavant Frères Organ, Op. 2892 (1966) at the Episcopal Church of St. Ignatius of Antioch - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
 
Casavant Frères Organ, Op. 2892 (1966) at the Episcopal Church of St. Ignatius of Antioch - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
     
Casavant Frères Organ, Op. 2892 (1966) at the Episcopal Church of St. Ignatius of Antioch - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
 
Episcopal Church of St. Ignatius of Antioch - New York City (photo: Steven E. Lawson)
           
  Flentrop Organ (1960) once in St. Ignatius of Antioch Church - New York City (Flentrop Orgelbouw)
Previous organ in present church:

Flentrop Orgelbouw
Zaandam, The Netherlands (1960)
Mechanical action
1 manual, 6 stops, 7 ranks




This "orgelpositief" was built in 1960 for St. Mark's Episcopal Church in Pittsburgh, Penn. About 1966, the organ was sold to a private individual who planned to install it in his West Side residence in New York City. For several years the organ was stored behind a chain link fence in The Spike, a bar located on Eleventh Avenue at 20th Street in Chelsea. About 1990, the organ was moved to St. Ignatius of Antioch, and still later (c.1995) to St. Thomas More Catholic Church for use in their chapel. The organ has since been purchased for the residence of Renée Anne Louprette.
               
Manuaal – 56 notes
8
  Holpijp
56
       
8
  Quintadeen
56
       
4
  Prestant
56
       
4
  Roerfluit
56
       
2
  Gemshoorn
56
       
    Cymbel I-II fach
88
       
               
Pedaal – 32 notes
    permanently coupled to manuaal      
           
Skinner Organ Company
Boston, Mass. – Opus 777 (1929)
Electro-pneumatic action
2 manuals, 24 stops, 9 ranks, 573 pipes


This organ was originally built for the Scarsdale, N.Y. residence of Otto Meyer (1875-1935), who was president of the Meyer-Brown Corporation, New York rubber merchants. At an unknown time, the organ was moved to St. Ignatius of Antioch Church where it was installed behind the existing organ case. In 1966, the organ was acquired by David Friedell, who installed the organ in his Sparta, N.J. residence, then in Newton, N.J.; in 1999 most of the chests and pipes were removed to Mr. Friedell's residence in Stonington, Maine.
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes
    Expression I       Expression II  
8
  Diapason
61
16
  Bourdon [unit]
97
8
  Voix Celeste II ranks
122
8
  Chimney Flute
8
  Flute Celeste II ranks
110
4
  Flute

     
2 2/3
  Nazard
       
2
  Piccolo
       
8
  Flugel Horn
61
       
8
  Vox Humana
61
       
8
  English Horn
61

     

  Tremolo  
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
    Duplicate of Great          

     

     
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
16
  Bourdon
MAN
       
16
  Gedeckt
MAN
       
               
Couplers
    Swell to Pedal   Great 4'
    Great to Pedal   Swell 16', 4'
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'    
           
  Organ in the Church of St. Ignatius of Antioch - New York City (Wurts Bros., c.1902)
Hook & Hastings
Boston, Mass. – Opus 1321 (1886) – moved (c.1902)
Electro-pneumatic action?
2 manuals, 29 registers







The original organ in the present church was the 1886 Hook & Hastings organ (Op. 1321) that was electrified and moved from the previous church. As seen in the photo at right (Wurts Bros., c.1902) the organ case is very similar to the one seen today. Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
           
  Hook & Hastings organ, Op. 1321 (1886) in chancel of Church of St. Ignatius of Antioch - New York City
Organ in church located at 56 West 40th Street:

Hook & Hastings
Boston, Mass. – Opus 1321 (1886)
Mechanical action
2 manuals, 29 registers


This organ by Hook & Hastings was installed in the chancel of the previous church on West 40th Street. The organ was electrified and moved to the present church in 1902. Specifications for this organ have not yet been located.
           
Organ in church located at 56 West 40th Street:

Ferris & Stuart
New York City (1862)
Mechanical action
1 manual


The specifications of this organ have not yet been located.
           
Organ in church located at 437 Seventh Avenue:

George Jardine & Son
New York City (1869)
Mechanical action


The specifications of this organ have not yet been located.
           
Sources:
     Aeolian-Skinner Archives web site: http://aeolian-skinner.110mb.com/
     Casavant Frères, Limitée Factory Specification (Oct. 27, 1964), Opus 2892. Courtesy Stanley Scheer.
     Church of St. Ignatius of Antioch web site: http://www.saintignatiusnyc.org
     Flentrop Orgelbouw web site: http://www.flentrop.nl/indexuk.html
     Gray, Louis H. "A History of Parish of Saint Ignatius in the City of New York: 1781-1946," published on the church web site.
     Kinzey, Allen, and Sand Lawn. E.M. Skinner/Aeolian-Skinner Opus List (New Revised Edition). Richmond: The Organ Historical Society, 1997.
     Nelson, George. Organs in the United States and Canada Database. Seattle, Wash.
     Organ Dedication Recital program (Nov. 6, 1966) with stoplist of Casavant Frères organ, Op. 2892 (1966). Courtesy Douglas Keilitz.
     "Report of the 2009–2011 Organ Campaign on the occasion of the Rededication of the Organ." Published by the church. Courtesy Douglas Keilitz.
     Sachs, Charles L. "The Charles F. Zabriskie Photographic Collection," master's thesis for State University of New York College at Oneonta, 1982.
     Services in a New Edifice: Opening of St. Ignatius P.E. Church at West End Avenue and West Eighty-seventh Street," The New York Times (Oct. 20, 1902).
     Trupiano, Larry. Electronic correspondence regarding Skinner Organ, Op. 777 (1929).
     Van Pelt, William T. The Hook Opus List, 1829-1916 in Facsimile. Richmond: The Organ Historical Society, 1991.

Illustrations:
     Flentrop Orgelbouw. Flentrop organ.
     Gray, Louis H. St. Paul's Dutch Reformed Church.
     Keilitz, Douglas. Photo of Keilitz Console (2011).
     Lawson, Steven E. Interior; Casavant organ and case.
     Wurts Bros. (New York, N.Y.). Photo (c.1902) of organ in present church. Collection of the Museum of the City of New York.