James Chapel of Union Theological Seminary - New York City (Photo: Jeff Scofield)
Union Theological Seminary

3041 Broadway at 121st Street
New York, N.Y. 10027 http://www.utsnyc.edu


Organ Specifications:
Claremont Avenue at 121st Street (since 1910):
James Chapel:
III/44 Holtkamp Organ Company, Op. 1954 (1980)
IV/67 M.P. Möller, Inc., Op. R-651 (1961)
IV/51 M.P. Möller, Inc., Op. 6976 (1941)
III/34 Austin Organ Company, Op. 267 (1909)
Lampman Chapel:
II/7 M.P. Möller, Inc., Op. R-429 (1952)
II/7 M.P. Möller, Inc., Op. 5537 (1929)
Lecture Room 207:
II/11 George Jardine & Son, Op. 1242 (1897) – moved
700 Fourth Avenue between 69th and 70th Streets (1884-1910):
II/11 George Jardine & Son, Op. 1242 (1897) – Adams Chapel
Jackson Avenue between 6th and 7th Streets (1836-1910):
I/6 J.H. & C.S. Odell, Op. 145 (1875)

See also the Studio and Practice Organs.


Original Building (1836-1884) of Union Theological Seminary - New York City  
Jackson Avenue (1836-84)  
Union Theological Seminary was founded in 1835 by nine Presbyterians, and was opened for instruction in 1836. Eight lots were purchased from Sailors' Snug Harbor: four of them fronted Jackson Avenue (later renamed University Place) between 6th and 7th Streets, and the other four lots were located to the east and faced Greene Street. In 1838, a three-story building that faced Jackson Avenue was completed, providing classrooms, a library and a chapel. This building was enlarged in 1852 with the addition of two upper stories.

In 1873, the board of directors explored the possibility of relocating to St. Nicholas Avenue between 130th and 134th Streets, and hired Richard Morris Hunt to draw up plans for a new campus. Hunt designed a 500-foot-long, four-story, brick and stone-trimmed building with T-shaped wings that would contain classrooms, a dormitory for 250 students, and a refectory. There were to be two chapels built of stone, and houses for each professor on the site's northern section. However, the Panic of 1873 made it impossible to collect pledges toward the $500,000 cost for the land and buildings, so Hunt's plans were never realized. Instead, the Jackson Avenue building was renovated and an addition for an expanded library, all designed J.C. Cady, were completed in 1875.

  Second Building (1884-1910) of Union Theological Seminary - New York City
  Fourth Avenue (1884-1910)
In 1881, a gift from Gov. Edgar D. Morgan enabled the trustees to purchase the blockfront on the west side of Fourth (now Park) Avenue between 69th and 70th Streets in the rapidly-developing residential area known as Lenox Hill. Land values along the avenue were depressed due to a semi-cut used by the New York and Harlem River Railroad, making property more affordable to institutions such as the Presbyterian Hospital, located on the block north of the seminary. The newly-opened Second Avenue and Third Avenue elevated lines provided easy access to the area. William A. Potter and his assistant James Brown Lord designed the Gothic-style complex that was built of red brick and Longmeadown stone. Two buildings with varied rooflines formed a quadrangle that occupied a frontage of 200 feet on Fourth Avenue and extended 125 feet deep. In the center of the Fourth Avenue building was the main entrance hall, above which were the chapel and its adjoining tower. At the 69th Street side were a library and museum, and at the 70th Street side were several lecture rooms. The five-story dormitory building, located at the rear of the site, was connected to the main building by a passageway through the middle of the inner courtyard. The new seminary facilities opened in 1884.

By the early twentieth century, the seminary had outgrown its buildings and could not easily expand, as the Upper East Side had by then filled with residential buildings that were home to the wealthy and land values were high. The board of directors wished to enlarge the seminary along university lines and concluded that the area near Columbia University in Morningside Heights would be a desirable location. Few sites remained near Columbia, but one had been located and a donor confidentially offered to provide $850,000 to purchase the land. The donor, D. Willis James, a wealthy Presbyterian benefactor and seminary board member, would ultimately provide additional gifts for the construction of the buildings. On January 9, 1906, President Charles Cuthbert Hall informed the board that the Committee on Site had retained two city blocks bounded by West 120th and 122nd streets, Broadway, and Claremont Avenue. Four leading architects were invited to submit plans, with a general invitation to others, resulting in a competition to be judged by architects Warren P. Laird of Philadelphia, Walter Cook of New York, and Robert Peabody of Boston. From a total of 35 submissions received, the judges and building committee chose the firm of Allen & Collens, who had designed an academic quadrangle in the English scholastic Gothic style.

1910 view of Union Theological Seminary - New York City (Library of Congress)  
c.1910 view looking northeast from
Claremont Avenue and West 120th Street
 
On November 17, 1908, the cornerstone was laid for the first phase of the seminary complex that would include the office and classroom wing, library, and residential buildings. Work on the chapel was begun shortly after. The $2,500,000 seminary was ready for occupancy in the fall of 1910, and was formally dedicated on November 29, 1910. The planned refectory and residential buildings along Claremont Avenue and the corner tower would be built later after funding had been secured.

James Memorial Chapel is named for D. Willis James, a merchant and philanthropist who served on the board of directors from 1867 until his death at age 75 in 1907. His widow donated $300,000 to build the chapel, which is dedicated to his memory. Located on the Claremont Avenue side of the seminary, James Chapel originally had a hammer beam ceiling of red oak, quartered oak wainscoting, and English stained glass. In 1980, the chapel was redesigned by architect Philip Ives, who removed the pews and permanent furnishings to allow a more flexible "space for grace."

Lampman Memorial Chapel was created as an intimate place for meditation, early morning communion and small services. Located in the refectory building, the chapel can hold about 50 persons, and was dedicated to the memory of the Rev. Dr. Lewis Lampman, who was for twenty-five years a director of the seminary. The chapel was was constructed and equipped at a cost of about $20,000, the gift of Leonard Lampman, son of the man to whom it was dedicated.

The School of Sacred Music
at Union was created by Clarence and Helen Dickinson, who had expressed a desire to the Rev. Dr. Henry Sloane Coffin, president of the seminary, that a place could be made at Union for church musicians to receive the best possible professional training and also undertake some study in church history and theology. The School of Sacred Music opened in the 1928 -1929 academic year and offered Master and Doctor of Sacred Music degrees. Clarence Dickenson retired as its director in 1945, succeeded by Hugh Porter, a graduate of the first class in 1930. After Porter’s death in 1960, Robert S. Baker, well-known organist and holder of both degrees from the school (1940, 1944), was named director and Dickinson Professor. During the turmoil of the late 1960s and early 1970s, a Planning Group was formed consisting of faculty, students and “at-large” members from outside the immediate Seminary community. Among its recommendations was the closing of the School of Sacred Music. Dean Baker reported to the group that the school had been living on a shoestring for too long and enrolment had dropped to the low 70s. The work of the school was to be continued at Yale with the founding of its Institute of Sacred Music, to which faculty members Baker and Richard French moved, along with the school’s endowment funds and library. Professor Daniel Day Williams said that the School’s removal “will cause a very aching void in the community.” For many years, a great number of people, alumni/ae included, harbored bitterness as well as sadness about the closing.

Today, Union is an independent, multi-denominational seminary.
           
  Holtkamp Organ (1980) in James Chapel of Union Theological Seminary - New York City (photo: Ken Stein)
Organ in James Chapel:

Holtkamp Organ Company
Cleveland, Ohio – Opus 1954 (1980)
Mechanical key action
Electric stop and combination action
3 manuals, 34 stops, 44 ranks



In the late 1970s, James Chapel was updated and renovated to provide a more flexible worship space. At the same time, the Holtkamp Organ Company was commissioned to built a new mechanical action organ that would replace the 1961 Möller instrument. Built in 1980, this three-manual Holtkamp organ is installed in a freestanding case at the rear of the chancel. Consultants for the organ were Vernon de Tar, Gerre Hancock, and John Weaver.
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes
16
  Principal
61
4
  Spitzflöte
61
16
  Pommer
61
2
  Super Octave
61
8
  Principal
61
 
  Sesquialtera (II ranks)
122
8
  Rohr Gedackt
61
    Mixture (IV ranks)
244
4
  Octave
61
8
  Trumpet
61

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Gamba
61
1 1/3
  Larigot
61
8
  Voix Celeste
61
 
  Scharf (III ranks)
183
8
  Rohrflöte
61
16
  Fagot
61
4
  Principal
61
8
  Cromorne
61
4
  Harmonic Flute
61
 
  Tremolo [later addition]  
2
  Waldflöte
61
 
     

     

     
Solo Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes
8
  Copula
61
8
  Fanfara [horizontal]
61
4
  Rohrflöte
61
1
  Zimbel (III ranks)
183

  Cornet (V ranks)
305
8
  Krummhorn
61
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
16
  Principal
GT
4
  Choralbass
32
16
  Subbass
32
 
  Rauschbass (II ranks)
64
8
  Octave
32
16
  Posaune
32
8
  Flute
32
8
  Trumpet
32
           
  M.P. Möller Organ, Op. R-651 (1961) at James Chapel of Union Theological Seminary - New York City
Organ in James Chapel:

M.P. Möller, Inc.
Hagerstown, Md. – Opus R-651 (1961)
Electro-pneumatic action
4 manuals, 67 stops, 67 ranks




In 1961, the Möller Company rebuilt and tonally altered their previous insrument, Op. 6976 (1941).
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
16
  Quintaton
61
2 2/3
  Twelfth
61
8
  Principal
61
2
  Super Octave
61
8
  Rohrflöte
61
 
  Fourniture III-IV ranks
220
4
  Octave
61
    Cymbal III ranks
183
4
  Spitzflöte
61
       

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Rohrgedeckt [unit]
85
1 1/3
  Larigot
61
8
  Prinzipalflöte
73
 
  Sesquialtera II ranks
122
8
  Rohrflöte
    Plein Jeu III ranks
183
8
  Viole de Gambe
73
16
  Fagotto
73
8
  Viole Celeste
73
8
  Trompette
73
4
  Principal
73
8
  Hautbois
73
4
  Flauto Traverso
73
4
  Hautbois [from 8']
2
  Octavin
61
    Tremolo  
               
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Contra Dulciana
73
2 2/3
  Nazard
61
8
  Holzflöte
73
2
  Blockflöte
61
8
  Erzähler
73
1 3/5
  Tierce
61
8
  Erzähler Celeste
73
    Scharf III ranks
183
4
  Geigen
61
8
  Clarinet
73
4
  Koppelflöte
73
    Tremolo  
               
Positiv Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes
8
  Gedeckt
61
1
  Sifflöte
61
4
  Nachthorn
61
8
  Singendregal
61
2
  Prinzipal
61
    Tremolo  
1 1/3
  Larigot
61
       

     

     
Bombarde Organ (Manual IV) – 61 notes
8
  Solo Flute
73
8
  Bombarde
73
4
  Principal
73
4
  Clarion
73

  Mixture III ranks
183
       
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
16
  Violone
32
2
  Octavin [ext.]
16
  Bourdon [unit]
44
2
  Nachthorn [ext.]
16
  Quintaton
GT
    Harmonics III ranks
96
16
  Rohrgedeckt
SW
    Mixture III ranks
96
16
  Dulciana
CH
32
  Fagotto [ext. SW]
12
8
  Principal [unit]
56
16
  Posaune [unit]
56
8
  Bourdon [ext.]
16
  Fagotto
SW
8
  Rohrgedeckt
SW
8
  Posaune [ext.]
4
  Octave [ext.]
4
  Clarion [ext.]
4
  Nachthorn [unit]
44
4
  Cromorne
CH
4
  Rohrflöte
SW
       
           
M.P. Möller, Inc.
Hagerstown, Md. – Opus 6976 (1941)
Electro-pneumatic action
4 manuals, 61 stops, 51 ranks


In 1941, M.P. Möller of Hagerstown, Md., rebuilt the 1909 Austin organ in James Chapel. Möller provided a new drawknob console (with tracker touch) of quartered oak finished to match existing woodwork, and added several ranks of new or reconditioned pipes. The scope of their work was described in the factory specifications (Jan. 13, 1941):
"The casing and front pipes of the present organ are to be used without change. The pipes of the present Seminary Chapel organ and other used pipes of proper scale and condition now in the builder's possession are to be used, all pipes to be thoroughly cleaned, repaired, revoiced, retone [sic] regulated, retuned, and to be put in first class condition in every way, including rescaling where necessary."
The following description was published in The Diapason (Nov. 1941):
"Noteworthy as the latest large and important organ to be installed in a prominent educational institution is the four-manual just finished by M. P. Möller, Inc., for Union Theological Seminary, New York City. The instrument is installed in James Chapel.  It is new except for the utilization of some of the pipes from the old organ and the old casing and front. The specifications were drawn up by Dr. Clarence Dickinson, head of the School of Sacred Music of the seminary, in consultation with Richard O. Whitelegg of the Möller staff. The tone of the organ has been the subject of very favorable reports from those who have heard it."
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes (4" pressure)
16
  Double Diapason
61
    Plein Jeu III-IV ranks *
220
8
  Diapason
61
8
  Tuba
SO
8
  Second Diapason
61
4
  Clarion
SO
8
  Clarabella
61
8
  Trumpet [preparation]
SO
8
  Viole d'Amour
61
    Tremolo  
4
  Octave
61
    Great to Great 16'  
4
  Harmonic Flute
61
    Great to Great 8' (Unison)  
2
  Super Octave *
61
    Great to Great 4'  

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed (4" pressure)
16
  Bourdon
73
    Cymbel III-IV ranks *
220
8
  Diapason
73
16
  Fagotto +
73
8
  Hohlflöte *
73
8
  Trumpet
73
8
  Viole
73
8
  Oboe
73
8
  Viole Celeste
73
8
  Vox Humana
73
8
  Echo Salicional
73
4
  Clarion [from Trumpet]
4
  Octave *
73
    Tremolo  
4
  Flauto Traverso
73
    Swell to Swell 16'  
4
  Salicet [from Echo Sal.]
    Swell to Swell 8' (Unison)  
2
  Flautino
61
    Swell to Swell 4'  
           
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed (4" pressure)
16
  Contra Dulciana
73
1 3/5
  Terz *
61
8
  Geigen Principal
73
8
  Clarinet
73
8
  Concert Flute
73
    Tremolo  
8
  Quintadena
73
   
Harp
61 bars
8
  Dulciana
73
    Celesta [from Harp, 1-12 repeat]
8
  Unda Maris *
73
    Tremolo  
4
  Flute d'Amour
73
    Choir to Choir 16'  
2 2/3
  Nasat *
61
    Choir to Choir 8' (Unison)  
2
  Spitzflöte *
61
    Choir to Choir 4'  
               
Solo Organ (Manual IV) – 61 notes, enclosed (10" pressure)
8
  Orchestral Flute *
73
4
  Clarion [from Tuba]
8
  Viola da Gamba *
73
8
 
French Horn
preparation
8
  Gamba Celeste *
73
8
 
Trumpet
preparation
4
  Harmonic Gedeckt *
73
    Tremolo  
8
  Tuba *
73
    Solo to Solo 16'  
8
  English Horn *
73
    Solo to Solo 8' (Unison)  
8
  Orchestral Oboe *
73
    Solo to Solo 4'  
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes (4" & 6" pressure)
16
  Diapason
32
8
  Bourdon [ext.]
16
  Second Diapason [unit]
44
8
  Gedeckt
SW
16
  Double Diapason
GT
4
  Hohlflöte
SW
16
  Bourdon [unit]
44
16
  Posaune [unit, 6" wind]
56
16
  Contra Dulciana
CH
16
  Fagotto +
SW
16
  Gedeckt
SW
8
  Posaune [ext.]
8
  Octave
GT
4
  Clarion [ext.]
8
  Principal [ext.]
       
       
* new or pipes reconditioned from stock
     
+ not in Factory Specification but listed in The Diapason (Nov. 1941)
Couplers
    Great to Pedal 8', 4'   Solo to Great 16', 8', 4'
    Swell to Pedal 8', 4'   Swell to Choir 16', 8', 4'
    Choir to Pedal 8', 4'   Solo to Choir 16', 8', 4'
    Solo to Pedal 8', 4'   Great to Solo 16', 8', 4'
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'   Swell to Solo 16', 8', 4'
    Choir to Great 16', 8', 4'   Solo to Swell 16', 8', 4'
               
Adjustable Combinations (Remote Control)
   
Solo Organ Pistons 0-1-2-3-4-5-6-7 (thumb) On & Off for Pedal *
Swell Organ Pistons 0-1-2-3-4-5-6-7 (thumb) On & Off for Pedal *
Great Organ Pistons 0-1-2-3-4-5-6-7 (thumb) On & Off for Pedal *
Choir Organ Pistons 0-1-2-3-4-5-6-7 (thumb) On & Off for Pedal *
Pedal Organ Pistons 0-1-2-3-4-5-6-7 (thumb & toe)  
General Pistons 0-1-2-3-4-5-6-7-8-9-10-11-12 (thumb)  
Couplers Pistons 0-1-2-3-4  
General Cancel Piston 00 (thumb) – also cancels Tutti  
   
 
* Great Piston 1 and 2 draws Pedal Combination 1
Great Piston 3 and 4 draws Pedal Combination 2
Great Piston 5 and 6 draws Pedal Combination 3
Great Piston 7 and 2 draws Pedal Combination 4
Same applies to Swell, Choir and Solo Pistons
               
Reversibles
    Swell to Great Reversible Piston
    Great to Pedal Reversible Piston and Pedal
    Swell to Pedal Reversible Piston and Pedal
    Choir to Pedal Reversible Piston and Pedal
    Tutti, Reversible Piston, Pedal and Tablet
               
Pedal Movements
    Balanced Expression Pedal, Swell Organ
    Balanced Expression Pedal, Choir Organ
    Balanced Expression Pedal, Solo Organ
    Balanced Crescendo Pedal (Thermometer Indicator) – six pistons
     
Accessories
    Signal light wired to rear of console
    Motor light (burns when blower is operating)
    Present motor and blower. New generator.
    Organ bench with music shelf.
    Concave Pedal (key action touch to be lighter than standard)
           
  Austin Organ, Op. 267 (ca.1910-15) in James Chapel, Union Theological Seminary - New York City (Austin Organ brochure, courtesy Jonathan Bowen)
Organ in James Chapel:

Austin Organ Company
Hartford, Conn. – Opus 267 (1909)
Electro-pneumatic action
3 manuals, 42 stops, 34 ranks



The original organ installed in James Chapel was built in 1909 by the Austin Organ Company of Hartford, Conn. Two versions of the stoplist exist: as recorded in 1910 by Louis F. Mohr, Sr., and as recorded by Charles Scharpeger in an "organ notebook" page dated September 28, 1931. Mr. Scharpeger's account show that several changes had been made, perhaps along with a new console. Pipecounts, extensions and borrows were not indicated on either specification but are suggested below, based on similar Austin organs of this era. The 1931 differences in stop names are indicated in [red].
               
Great Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes
16
  Major Diapason [Open Diap.]
61
8
  Clarinet Flute [Claribel Flute]
61
8
  Principal Diapason [1st Op.D.]
61
8
  Viole d'Amour [Viola d'Amour]
61
8
  Small Diapason [2nd Op.D.]
61
4
  Octave
61
8
  Gross Floete
61
4
  Harmonic Flute
61
8
  Gamba
61
8
  Trumpet
61

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual III) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Bourdon
73
16
  Contra Posaune
73
8
  Open Diapason
73
8
  Cornopean
73
8
  Rohr Floete
73
8
  Oboe
73
8
  Viole d'Orchestre
73
8
  Orchestral Oboe
73
8
  Viole Celeste
73
8
  [Vox Humana]
73
4
  Violina [8' Echo Salicional]
73
    Tremulant  
4
  Flauto Traverso
73
       
               
Choir Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
16
  Contra Dulciana
73
8
  Dulciana
73
8
  Geigen Principal
73
4
  Flute d'Amour
73
8
  Concert Flute
73
2
  Piccolo
61
8
  Unda Maris [TC]
61
8
  Clarinet
73
8
  Quintadena
73
    Tremulant  
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
32
  [Resultant]
16
  Dulciana
CH
16
  First Open Diapason [unit]
44
8
  Gross Flute [Op. Diap.]
16
  [Second Open Diapason]
GT
8
  Violoncello [Violone]
16
  Violone [unit]
44
8
  Flauto Dulciana [Flauto Dolce]
16
  Bourdon
32
16
  Posaune
SW
16
  Lieblich Gedeckt
SW
       
               
Couplers
    Harp       Swell Unison Release  
    "17 couplers" [not listed]       Choir Unison Release  
               
Adjustable Combinations
    Pistons No. 1-2-3-4-5-6 affecting Great Organ stops
    Pistons No. 1-2-3-4-5-6 affecting Swell Organ stops
    Pistons No. 1-2-3-4-5-6 affecting Choir Organ stops
    Pistons No. 1-2-3 affecting Pedal Organ stops
               
Pedal Movements
    Balanced Swell Pedal   Great to Pedal Reversible
    Balanced Choir Pedal   Sforzando Reversible
    Balanced Crescendo Pedal      
           
Organ in Lampman Chapel:

M.P. Möller, Inc.
Hagerstown, Md. – Opus R-429 (1952)
Electro-pneumatic action
2 manuals, 17 stops, 7 ranks


This was a factory rebuild of Möller's Opus 5537 (1929). The Factory Specification dated March 21, 1952, shows that Möller provided a new console mechanism in the existing shell.
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Diapason
61
8
  Spitzprincipal
73
8
  Gedeckt
85
4
  Flute [Gedeckt]
8
  Salicional
73
8
  Trumpet
SW

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Gedeckt
GT
2 2/3
  Flute Twelfth
GT
8
  Salicional
GT
2
  Piccolo
GT
8
  Vox Celeste [TC]
61
8
  Trumpet
73
4
  Spitzprincipal
GT
    Tremulant  
4
  Flute
GT
       
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
16
  Bourdon
32
8
  Gedeckt
GT
16
  Lieblich Gedeckt [lo-press.]
       
               
Couplers
    Great to Pedal       Great 16', 4'  
    Swell to Pedal       Swell 16', 4'  
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'          
               
Adjustable Combinations
    Pistons No. 1-2-3-4-5 affecting Great and Pedal Stops
    Pistons No. 1-2-3-4-5 affecting Swell and Pedal Stops
               
Pedal Movements
    Balanced Swell Pedal   Great to Pedal Reversible
    Balanced Crescendo Pedal      
           
Organ in Lampman Chapel:

M.P. Möller, Inc.
Hagerstown, Md. – Opus 5537 (1929)
Electro-pneumatic action
2 manuals, 17 stops, 7 ranks


The Factory Specifications dated February 23, 1929, shows that this organ had a two-manual stop-key console, casing of "Native wood" (plain, soft, white oak), and was voiced on 5" wind pressure. Mr. E[dward]. Luberoff of Möller wrote the following to the factory via inter-office correspondence, dated Feb. 27, 1929:

We are enclosing herewith signed contracts in the amount of $2520.00 for organ to be installed in above Chapel. Mr. Clarence Dickinson is in charge at this Seminary as you know, and we are building this organ for him.--another mark of Mr. Dickinson's friendship and preference for Moller.

I am sure that you are going to take all means possible to make this a very fine instrument. Mr. Dickinson tells me that there are over 400 ministers at this Seminary from all parts of the country, and it will be a great ad for us.

This organ was rebuilt by Möller in 1952 as Op. R-429 (see above).
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Open Diapason
61
8
  Salicional
73
8
  Gedeckt [unit]
85
4
  Flute [Gedeckt]
8
  Dulciana
73
8
  Oboe
SW

     

     
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 61 notes, enclosed
8
  Gedeckt
GT
4
  Flute
GT
8
  Dulciana
GT
2 2/3
  Nazard
GT
8
  Salicional
GT
2
  Piccolo
GT
8
  Vox Celeste [TC]
61
8
  Oboe
73
               
Pedal Organ – 32 notes
16
  Bourdon
32
8
  Gedeckt
GT
16
  Lieblich Gedeckt [lo-press.]
       
               
Couplers
    Great to Pedal       Great 16', 4'  
    Swell to Pedal       Swell 16', 4'  
    Swell to Great 16', 8', 4'          
               
Mechanicals
    Tremulant          
    Crescendo Indicator          
               
Adjustable Combinations
    Pistons No. 1-2-3-4-5 Affecting Swell and Pedal Stops
    Pistons No. 1-2-3-4-5 Affecting Great and Pedal Stops
               
Pedal Movements
    Great to Pedal Reversible   Balanced Swell Pedal
    Swell to Pedal Reversible   Grand Crescendo Pedal
           
Organ in Adams Chapel at 700 Fourth Avenue location:

George Jardine & Son
New York City – Opus 1242 (1897); reb. Eifert & Stoehr
Mechanical action
2 manuals, 11 stops, 11 ranks


The typed specification for this organ is from the files of Louis F. Mohr & Co., a longtime organ service firm in the area. Mohr shows that this organ was installed in Adams Chapel of Union Theological Seminary at 700 Park (Fourth) Avenue, and "The general removal to the New Building will be during the Christmas vacation." Handwritten notes state that the was "in lecture Room 207," the compasses were 58 notes (manual) and 30 notes (pedal), it was "Rebuilt by Eifert & Stoehr," and had an "Oak Case."
               
Great Organ (Manual I) – 58 notes, enclosed
8
  Open Diapason
58
4
  Principal
58
8
  Gamba
58
2
  Fifteenth
58
8
  Clarinet Flute
58
       
               
Swell Organ (Manual II) – 58 notes, enclosed
8
  Melodia
58
4
  Flute Harmonic
58
8
  Salicional
58
4
  Salicet
58
8
  Aeoline
58
       
               
Pedal Organ – 30 notes
16
  Bourdon
30
       
               
Couplers
    Great to Pedal       Swell to Great  
    Swell to Pedal       Swell to Great at 8va  
               
Accessories
    "Divided Swell Pedal for shades of Gt & Sw"  
    [Balanced Swell Pedal]          
    [Balanced Great Pedal]       Wind Indicator  
           
Organ in original location on Jackson Avenue between 6th and 7th Streets:

J.H. & C.S. Odell
New York City – Opus 145 (1875)
Mechanical action
1 manual, 6 stops, 6 ranks


The handwritten contract, dated June 4, 1875, for this organ states:

Specification of an Organ for the Union Theological Seminary, N.Y. The Organ to have one manual and a Pedal of 20 notes. Compass of manuals from CC to A, 58 notes. To be set in a chamber made for that purpose, enclosed with a screen made with ash wood and pipes the said pipes to be gilded with ornamental tops...All enclosed in a swell except the front and Pedal pipes. The swell to have equilibrium shades and balance Pedal. The bellows to blow by foot pedal and by hand lines.

               
Manual Organ – 58 notes, enclosed
8
  Open Diapason
58
4
  Principal
58
8
  Dulce [grooved bass]
58
2
  Fifteenth
58
8
  Clarionet Flute [wood]
58
       
               
Pedal Organ – 20 notes
16
  Bourdon [wood]
20
    Pedal Coupler  
            Bellows Signal  
           
Sources:
     "Church Unity Plea Opens New Seminary," The New York Times (Nov. 30, 1910).
     The Diapason (Nov. 1941). Specifications of M.P. Möller Organ, Op. 6976 (1941).
     Dolkart, Andrew S. Morningside Heights: A History of Its Architecture & Development. New York: Columbia University Press, 1998.
     Dunlap, David W. From Abyssinian to Zion: A Guide to Manhattan's Houses of Worship. New York: Columbia University Press, 2004.
     M.P. Möller Inc. Factory Specifications (Jan. 13, 1941) of M.P. Möller Organ, Op. 6976. Courtesy Larry Trupiano.
     M.P. Möller Inc. Factory Specifications (Mar. 21, 1952) of M.P. Möller Organ, Op. R-429. Courtesy Larry Trupiano.
     M.P. Möller Inc. Factory Specifications of M.P. Möller Organ, Op. R-651 (1961). Courtesy Jeff Scofield.
     M.P. Möller Inc. Inter-Office Correspondence (Feb. 27, 1929) in re M.P. Möller Organ, Op. 5537 (1929). Courtesy Larry Trupiano.
     Mohr, Louis F. Specifications for Austin Organ, Op. 267 (1910). Courtesy Larry Trupiano.
     Mohr, Louis F. Specifications for George Jardine & Son Organ, Op. 1242 (1897). Courtesy Larry Trupiano.
     "New Theological Buildings. The Many Handsome Gifts to the Union Seminary," The New York Times (Dec. 10, 1884).
     "Noted Divines See New Site Dedicated," The New York Times (Nov. 18, 1908).
     Scharpeger, Charles. 1931 Specifications of Austin Organ, Op. 267 (1909). Courtesy Larry Trupiano.
     "Seminary Opens Chapel," The New York Times (Nov. 12, 1929).
     Trupiano, Larry. Factory Contract for J.H. & C.S. Odell Organ, Op. 145 (1875).
     Union Theological Seminary web site: http://www.utsnyc.edu/

Illustrations:
     Austin Organ Company brochure. Austin Organ, Op. 267 (1909). Courtesy Jonathan Bowen.
     Harper's Weekly (Feb. 9, 1884). Engraving of Fourth Avenue building.
     Holtkamp Organ Company advertisement, Music / The A.G.O.-R.C.C.O. Magazine (Sep. 1980).
     Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Online. View (c.1910) of Union Theological Seminary; Irving Underhill, photographer.
     Scofield, Jeff. Exterior of James Chapel; interior of James Chapel showing M.P. Möller organ, R-651 (1961).
     Union Theological Seminary web site. Drawing of Jackson Avenue building.